Natural Resources Management and Environmental Sciences

Catalog Home

Baker Center for Sciences and Mathematics Bldg. (180), Room 209
Phone: 805.756.2702; Fax: 805.756.1402
https://nres.calpoly.edu/

Department Head: Jeremy James

Academic Programs

Program name Program type
Environmental Earth and Soil Sciences BS
Environmental Management and Protection BS
Environmental Soil Science Minor
Environmental Sciences and Management MS
Forest and Fire Sciences BS
Indigenous Studies in Natural Resources and the Environment Minor
Land Rehabilitation and Restoration Ecology Minor

The Natural Resources Management and Environmental Sciences department offers three undergraduate majors - Environmental Earth and Soil Sciences, Environmental Management and Projection, and Forest and Fire Sciences. Students have access to several thousand acres of agricultural, forest, and rangeland managed by the college. Students gain hands-on experience with equipment and techniques in common use by environmental scientists, environmental managers and planners, foresters, wildland fire fighters, natural resources managers , soil scientists, agricultural scientists, and geologists. The department is equipped for analysis of soil, plant, tree, rock, and water samples. Analytical methods available to students include gas chromatography for analysis of greenhouse gases, portable x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), high temperature combustion analysis of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, petrographic microscopy with digital image analysis, as well as a suite of microbiological, geographic and geospatial analytical techniques and instrumentation.

The department maintains greenhouse research space and operates state-of-the-art weather monitoring equipment on Cal Poly rangelands, providing data for a wide variety of interdisciplinary research projects.

Experiential Learning

The Natural Resources Management and Environmental Sciences Department has a number of outdoor field sites where faculty and student learn-by-doing projects and research are conducted. Facilities sited at the Cal Poly campus include a Forestry Skills Center, computer labs, GIS laboratories, Coastal Resources Institute Research field lab, and several well-equipped greenhouses. Moreover, the department works closely with Cal Poly’s School Forest at Swanton Pacific Ranch, near Santa Cruz, California to ensure our students have many opportunities to engage at this hands-on learning resource. This 3800-acre ranch includes redwood forests, salmonid-bearing streams, agricultural land, and many other ecosystems. The Swanton Pacific Ranch provides hands-on learning of active forest, ranch, agricultural, and watershed management activities. The management of these forest resources is internationally certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. Students make extensive use of these facilities. Significant field work and laboratory activities occur in all undergraduate and graduate programs.

In addition to these campus-based learning experiences, the department places great importance on work experience before graduation. Work experience validates the student's career goals, confirms the relevance of their classroom education, while offering a pathway to employment. Students can earn course credit through internships, supervisory courses, and/or for volunteer or paid work positions related to their major.

Students are encouraged to reinforce their education, develop professional contacts, and strengthen their career potential by participating in any of the following activities: the Environmental Sciences Club; the Soil Judging Team; Association of Environmental Professionals Student Chapter (AEP); Society of American Foresters Student Chapter (SAF); Logging Team; Student Association of Fire Ecology; and/or Xi Sigma Pi Forestry Honorary Society; attending international and national conferences; and internships and cooperative education programs with government and industry. Each of these opportunities, combined with a friendly, helpful atmosphere, provide students a college experience that is highly personal as well as rewarding. Students also are encouraged to investigate opportunities for international education through Cal Poly's International Center.

How to Read Course Descriptions

ERSC Courses

ERSC 144. Introduction to Earth Science. 4 units

Survey of fundamental processes of Earth science. Application of systems thinking to understanding the dynamic interactions among geological, geographic, soils and human factors in shaping the Earth. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

ERSC 223. Rocks and Minerals. 4 units

Prerequisite: SS 120; and CHEM 124 or CHEM 127.

Origin, composition, identification and weathering of rocks, minerals, and clays important in the development of soils. Parent materials as related to the nature and properties of soils. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ERSC 250. Physical Geography. 4 units

Addresses the origins and patterns of the earth's diverse assemblage of climates, landforms, biota and soils. A major focus on relationship between human cultures and these earthly environments. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 250.

ERSC 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 270.

ERSC 303. Soil Erosion and Water Conservation. 4 units

Prerequisite: LA/NR 218 or GEOG 318; and SS 120.

Evaluation of soil and water conservation with application toward agriculture, rangeland, and urban land uses. Study of process, regulation, and best management practices for soil erosion, water quality, and stormwater. Development of stormwater pollution prevention or farm water quality plans to meet regulatory requirements. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

ERSC 325. Climate and Humanity. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Geographic perspective on the interrelationships between climate and human cultures. Effects of people on climate and the influence of climate and weather upon human activities and behavior. Focus on global human conditions which are responsible for the alteration of climate and in turn are vulnerable to climate change. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 325.

ERSC 333. Human Impact on the Earth. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Global assessment of the impact of humans on the earth's vegetation, animals, soil, water and atmosphere. Emphasis on problems stemming from the interactions of human attitudes, technologies, and population with natural resources. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 333.

ERSC 335. Soil, Water, and Civilization. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B5, B6, or B7

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Explore past civilizations and how management of soil, water, and other natural resources allowed them to flourish, decline, or fail. Sustainability of natural resource use in modern/future societies. Issues include sustainability, agricultural practices, deforestation, water quality, and land management. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area Upper-Division B (GE Areas B5, B6, or B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog).

ERSC 339. Internship in Environmental Earth and Soil Sciences. 1-12 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Consent of internship instructor.

Selected students will spend up to 12 weeks with an approved firm or agency engaged in work and study related to their major. A detailed written proposal and written interim and final reports required. One unit of credit may be allowed for each full week of internship. Credit/No Credit grading. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 339.

ERSC 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Individual investigation, research, studies or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 12 units. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 400.

ERSC 401. Field-Geology Methods. 4 units

Prerequisite: GEOL 102 or GEOL 201, GEOL 241, GEOL 415, ERSC 223, ERSC 323.

Collecting and interpreting field-geologic data. Description of sedimentary rocks and construction of stratigraphic columns. Mapping geologic structures in the field. Surficial geologic stratigraphy and surficial geologic mapping. Understanding geologic processes through field study. Communicating results of field study. 1 lecture, 3 activities. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOL 401.

ERSC 402. Geologic Mapping. 4 units

Prerequisite: ERSC/GEOL 401.

Bedrock geologic mapping on topographic maps and aerial photos. Surficial geologic mapping on topographic maps and aerial photos. Correlating and defining surficial geologic map units on the basis of soil development. Understanding landscape evolution using soil development 4 activities. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOL 402.

ERSC 414. Global and Regional Climatology. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

The earth's pattern of climates and the physical processes that account for them. Focus on interrelationships between climate and the physical/biological and cultural environments. Special emphasis on modern climate changes and their consequences. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 414.

ERSC 415. Applied Meteorology and Climatology. 4 units

Prerequisite: ERSC/GEOG 250.

Physical processes in the atmosphere that determine regional weather, climate and climate variability. Surface and satellite systems for weather observation, and weather/climate modeling. Dynamics of weather systems, including thunderstorms and hurricanes. Emphases on weather/climate affecting agriculture and other human activities. 3 lectures, 1 activity. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 415.

ERSC 423. Geomorphology. 4 units

Prerequisite: SS 120 or SS 121; and GEOL 201.

Evaluation of processes shaping landscapes. Field-based production of surficial geologic maps. Field, aerial photograph, and topographic map analysis to assess processes shaping landscapes. Interpretation of landforms and landform relationships. Understanding how tectonics and climate influence landscapes. Fundamentals of soil geomorphology. Field trip required. 2 lectures, 1 laboratory, 1 activity. Formerly ERSC 323.

ERSC 442. Applied Environmental Groundwater Hydrology. 4 units

Prerequisite: ERSC 144 or GEOL 201; MATH 141 or MATH 161; and SS 120.

Applied field methods of vadose zone and groundwater flow modeling, resource evaluation, confined and unconfined aquifer characterization, well installation and groundwater monitoring. Introduction to groundwater modeling software including MODFLOW and AQTESOLV. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Formerly SS 442.

ERSC 443. Applied Environmental Contaminant Transport. 4 units

Applied study of mechanisms of fate and transport of contaminants in soils and groundwater. Field methods and technologies of soil and groundwater sampling and site characterization. Representative conceptual and mathematical models, case studies, laboratory study of breakthrough behavior, and remediation technologies. Field trip required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ERSC 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 470.

ERSC 471. Selected Advanced Laboratory. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 laboratories. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 471.

ERSC 476. Senior Project - Advanced Internship Experience in Environmental Science/Management. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and ERSC 363 or NR 306 or NR 326.

Independent internship experience conducted under faculty supervision focusing on a discipline area of environmental science/management. Completion of a project as a component of their internship. Satisfies the senior project requirement. Minimum 90 hours required. Crosslisted as ERSC/NR 476.

ERSC 477. Senior Project - Research Experience in Environmental Science. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and ERSC 363 or NR 306 or NR 326.

Guided research experience in a specific area of environmental science. Implementation of materials and methods. Collection, analysis and interpretation of data. Completion of formal written report. Satisfies senior project requirement. 1 lecture, 2 laboratories. Crosslisted as ERSC/NR 477.

ERSC 478. Senior Project - Current Topics in Environmental Science/Management. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and ERSC 363 or NR 306 or NR 326.

Critical evaluation and formal presentation of current issues in environmental science/management. Evaluation of current topics, analysis of supporting evidence, and synthesis and presentation of resulting perspectives on different approaches to current challenges in environmental science/management. Satisfies the senior project requirement. 3 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/NR 478.

ERSC 479. Senior Project - Independent Study. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; ERSC 363 or NR 306 or NR 326; and consent of instructor.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Project results are presented in a formal report. Minimum 90 hours total time. Crosslisted as ERSC/NR 479.

ERSC 570. Selected Topics in Earth Science. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 seminars.

ERSC 571. Selected Advanced Laboratory. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 laboratories.

ESCI Courses

ESCI 500. Individual Study. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Advanced independent study planned and completed under the direction of a member of the NRES department faculty. Open only to graduate students who have demonstrated ability to do independent work. Total credit limited to 16 units; with a maximum of 4 units per quarter. Formerly NR 500.

ESCI 501. Research Planning. 4 units

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Problem solving and research planning for agriculture, natural resources and related sciences. Preparation of study plans that identify problems, review appropriate literature, formulate objectives, develop methods and provide for presentation and interpretation of results. Oral reports. 4 lectures. Formerly SS 501.

ESCI 502. Research Methods and Data Analysis. 4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor; ESCI 501; and STAT 217.

Quantitative and qualitative survey of research methods for environmental science and management including research design, sampling, data collection, analysis, and interpretation. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ESCI 550. Advanced Environmental Science. 4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor; and STAT 217. Corequisite: ESCI 501. Recommended: An environmental science/management course.

Advanced study of earth system processes and environmental problems. Advanced application of systems thinking to study of energy, geologic systems, groundwater and surface water resources, soils, environmental pollution and degradation, atmospheric and ocean dynamics, and the global climate system. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

ESCI 581. Graduate Seminar in Environmental Sciences. 2 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Student study and presentation of selected developments, trends and problems in environmental science, forest and natural resources, earth and soil sciences, and environmental management. Total credit limited to 4 units. 2 seminars. Formerly NR/SS 581.

ESCI 590. Advanced Environmental Management. 4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor; and ESCI 501. Recommended: An environmental science/management course.

Scientific principles of environmental issues and environmental management practices focusing on sustainable development and systems thinking centered around the health of humans and ecosystems. Analysis of fundamental and emerging environmental factors that impact management practices. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ESCI 596. Environmental Sciences and Management Project. 5 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor; ESCI 502; ESCI 550; ESCI 581; and ESCI 590.

Individual research or study toward a professional project that leads to an improved understanding of the physical environment, solution of an environmental problem, natural resources management, or an improved interaction between society and the natural environment. 5 lectures.

ESCI 599. Thesis. 1-9 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Individual research in environmental science, environmental management under the general supervision of faculty, leading to a graduate thesis. Degree credit limited to 9 units. Formerly NR 599.

NR Courses

NR 140. Careers in Natural Resources Management and Environmental Sciences. 1 unit

Analysis and development of career goals in natural resources and environmental sciences. Acquainting students with potential career options and preparation of academic plans for the majors in the Natural Resources Management and Environmental Sciences Department. 1 activity.

NR 141. Introduction to Forest Ecosystem Management. 3 units

Fundamentals of forestry including basic silviculture, forest protection, measurement and policy. Integrated resource management of forest lands for water production, forage, recreation, wildlife, and timber. 3 lectures.

NR 142. Environmental Management. 3 units

Recommended: NR 140.

Environmental management as a process within functioning societies seeking a harmonious balance between human activities and intrinsic behavior of the natural environment. Major components of the natural environment and the political and social activities that impact that environment. 3 lectures.

NR 200. Special Problems for Undergraduates. 1-12 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Credit/No Credit grading only. Total credit limited to 12 units. Formerly ERSC/SS 200.

NR 203. Resource Law Enforcement. 3 units

Law enforcement applied to natural resource conservation on public and private lands. Examination of state and federal laws related to fish and wildlife management. Problems associated with implementation of resource laws examined. 3 lectures. Crosslisted as NR/RPTA 203.

NR 204. Wildland Fire Control. 3 units

Fire control techniques used on various wildland fuels. Elementary fire physics, fuels, weather, fire behavior, tactics and fire suppression techniques, line construction, "mop-up", fire line safety, air operations and fire organization. Meets basic wildland fire fighter certification requirements for the USDA Forest Service. Partially meets California Department of Forestry Firefighter I requirements. 2 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 208. Dendrology. 4 units

Recommended: BOT 121.

Identification, classification, silvical characteristics, distribution, environmental requirements and economic importance of woody plants in shrub, woodland, and forest ecosystems of the United States. Emphasis on species located in the Pacific Coastal, Sierran, and Cascade ecosystems. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

NR 215. Land and Resource Measurements. 1 unit

Introduction to land and resource measurement technology and methods - field instruments, property description, map and photograph reconciliation, data accuracy and precision. Trigonometric functions as applied to natural resources applications. Field trips required. 1 laboratory.

NR 218. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). 3 units

Learn the fundamental concepts and functions of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) using ArcGIS platform. Create, manage, analyze, and display geographically referenced data. Explore how GIS is applied to analyze environmental, social, and natural resource issues. 1 lecture, 2 laboratories. Crosslisted as LA/NR 218.

NR 247. Forest Surveying. 2 units

Prerequisite: NR 215.

Use and care of tapes, staff compass, abney levels, total stations, and GPS receivers. Keeping field notes, measurements by tape. Closed and open traverse by compass and total stations. Turning angles and determining directions of lines. Map reading and public land description. GPS measurements. Weekend field trips required. 1 lecture, 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as BRAE/NR 247.

NR 260. Forest Operations. 4 units

Recommended: NR 141 and NR 215.

Relationships between forest ecosystem management, forest practices, harvesting methods, timber harvest planning, components of forest harvesting, harvesting effects; cost analysis of harvesting methods; safety management; value-added forest utilization; environmental protection; and road location. Overnight or weekend field trips required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

NR 290. Intercollegiate Forestry Activities. 1 unit

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to those qualified to compete in intercollegiate forestry activities and consent of instructor.

Beginning through advanced skills in the event areas of college forestry activities. Instruction in use of specialized equipment and safety. Minimum of 4 hours of laboratory per week. Total credit limited to 18 units. Credit/No Credit grading only.

NR 304. Agroecology. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B5, B6, or B7

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and STAT 217 or STAT 218.

Ecological concepts and principles applied to the design and management of agricultural systems. Discussion of research in agroecology and assessment of cropping system sustainability. Laboratory section emphasizes field assessment of ecological structures and functions, experimental design and data interpretation. 3 lectures. 1 laboratory. Fulfills GE Area Upper-Division B (GE Areas B5, B6, or B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog).

NR 305. Forest Ecology and Silvics. 4 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area B2; and completion of GE Area B3 (GE Area B4 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Examination of major forest types and the processes that determine their development and productivity across the earth (silvics). Integration of ecosystem ecology, plant physiology, and soil science to develop understanding of forest response to disturbance. Field trip required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 306. Natural Resource Ecology and Habitat Management. 4 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area B2; and completion of GE Area B3 (GE Area B4 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Resource ecology and management implications in the major ecosystems of North America. Importance of maintaining the natural dynamics of energy flow and nutrient cycles at the community and ecosystem level to sustain uses and values. Humanity's role as a principal factor of change of the resources in natural systems. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 307. Fire Ecology. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area B2; and completion of GE Area B3 (GE Area B4 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Effects of wildland fires on shrub, woodland, and forest environments to include fuels, plants, soil, water, wildlife, and air. Emphasis on western U.S. forest and shrub ecosystems. 2 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 308. Fire and Society. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one lower-division course in GE Area D.

Prehistorical and historical record of human use of and attitude toward fire. Mythology and religion of fire. Traditional, cultural and ethnic variations and their influence on modern U.S. institutions involved in managing fire. 3 lectures, 1 activity. Crosslisted as ES/NR 308. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

NR 310. Global Climate Change. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B5, B6, or B7

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Examination and assessment of the physical and biological mechanisms that maintain current global climate regimes and the broad natural resource, political, and social conflict associated with a changing climate system. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area Upper-Division B (GE Areas B5, B6, or B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog).

NR 312. Technology of Wildland Fire Management. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B5, B6, or B7

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Historic, current and future perspectives of wildland fire in California. Sustainability and ecosystem health. The use of models and technology to solve complex land management problems. Assumptions and limitations of fire behavior and suppression models. 3 lectures, 1 activity. Fulfills GE Area Upper-Division B (GE Areas B5, B6, or B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog).

NR 314. Environmental Life-Cycle Analysis. 4 units

Prerequisite: BIO 263, NR 304, NR 305, or NR 306.

Estimation and assessment of environmental impacts of human activity and product development using life-cycle analysis methodology; organization and presentation of modeling results. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 315. Forest Mensuration. 4 units

Prerequisite: BRAE 237 or BRAE 239; NR 215; and STAT 217 or STAT 218. Recommended: MATH 161 or MATH 221.

Principles and methods of sampling and measurement for forest and natural resource quantities and qualities. Modeling and estimation for tree volumes, stand structure and composition, and related forest vegetation. Applications in sampling, statistical and inventory techniques. Field trip required. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

NR 317. The World of Spatial Data and Geographic Information Technology. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B5, B6, or B7

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Foundation for understanding the world through geographic information as well as the tools available to utilize spatial data. Experience with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related technology. Not open to students with credit in GEOG 218 or LA/NR 218. 3 lectures, 1 activity. Crosslisted as LA/NR 317. Fulfills GE Area Upper-Division B (GE Areas B5, B6, or B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog).

NR 320. Watershed Processes and Management. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR/LA 218 and SS 120. Recommended: NR 304, NR 305, or NR 306.

Introduction, analysis, and measurement of watershed processes of precipitation, evapotranspiration, streamflow, stream channels, erosion, and riparian functions. Watershed management toward aquatic habitat and water quality goals. Weekend field trip required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 321. Water Resources Technology and Society. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B5, B6, or B7

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Study of technologies for sustainable management of water resources. Focus on monitoring of drinking water supply and quality, groundwater wells, surface water storage and conveyance systems, industrial, and oil/gas water use and management, and stresses due to climate change. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area Upper-Division B (GE Areas B5, B6, or B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog).

NR 323. Human Dimensions in Natural Resources Management. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and completion of GE Area D1.

Social, economic, political and ecological conditions and institutions that influence decisions affecting the environment; examination of human-caused environmental impacts and how they in turn influence social institutions. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

NR 324. Social Dimensions of Sustainable Food and Fiber Systems. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and two lower-division courses in GE Area D.

Historical, political, socio-economic, and cultural dimensions of sustainable food and fiber systems. Overview of frameworks used for understanding agro-ecological sustainability with an emphasis on human elements. Exploration of core sustainability concepts, practices, and goals through case studies. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

NR 326. Natural Resources Economics and Valuation. 4 units

Prerequisite: MATH 161 or MATH 221 or equivalent. Recommended: GE Area D2 (ECON 201 recommended), AGB 212.

Theory of efficient use of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources, including methods for attaching value to marketable and non-market natural resources. Environmental economic theories and techniques to address allocation of water, timber, wildlife/fisheries, open space, and recreation. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

NR 328. Environmental Leadership and Community Engagement. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); one lower-division course in GE Area D; and completion of GE Area E (GE Area D4 for students on the 2017-19 or earlier catalogs).

Theories and practices of leadership and community engagement for a wide range of environmental issues. Development of personal leadership skills and methods for effectively working with non-profit organizations, governmental agencies, community groups, and the private sector to advance sustainability principles. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as NR/RPTA 328. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

NR 335. Conflict Management in Natural Resources. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR 141 or NR 142. Recommended: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Application of behavioral science principles and techniques in the management of natural resource systems. Management of internal and external human resource issues and concerns in natural resources organizations is emphasized. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 339. Internship in Forest and Natural Resources. 1-12 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Selected students will spend up to 12 weeks with an approved firm or agency engaged in forest or natural resources management. Applying and developing managerial skills and abilities. One unit of credit may be allowed for each full week of completed and reported internship. Credit/No Credit grading.

NR 340. Wildland Fire Management. 3 units

Prerequisite: NR 204.

Wildland fuels, fire weather, and fire danger ratings in chaparral, grassland, and forested areas. Advanced modeling of surface and crown fire behavior. Fire management strategies and implications, policies and objectives of fire management organizations. Saturday field trips may be required. 3 lectures.

NR 349. Water for a Sustainable Society. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and two lower-division courses in GE Area D.

Historical, political, economic, socio-technical, and cultural dimensions of water sustainability. Overview of complex systems with an emphasis on individual choices and their impact on water sustainability. Exploration of core sustainability concepts; practices, barriers and goals related to water resources. Course offered online only. 4 lectures. Crosslisted BRAE/NR 349. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

NR 350. Urban Forestry. 3 units

Prerequisite: NR 208.

Establishment and management of municipal forests, wildland-urban interface, wildlife habitat, and pollution abatement. Management of forest areas requiring special attention because of heavy recreational use, fire hazard, watershed, and societal values. Full-day field trips may be required. 2 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 351. Introduction to Emergency Management in California. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area B1 (GE Area B3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs) or GE Area D.

Emergency management emphasizing the Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) and Emergency Operations Center (EOC) operations. Earthquake hazard used as the case to explore potential wide geographic impacts, multiple secondary hazards, and multidisciplinary problem-solving methods in natural disasters faced by local governments and communities. 2 lectures, 1 activity. Crosslisted as CRP/NR 351.

NR 355. Drone Assisted Surveying. 4 units

Prerequisite: BRAE 239; GEOG 328 or BRAE 345; NR 218 or GEOG 318; and STAT 217 or STAT 218.

Integration of remote sensing, surveying, natural resource management, applied drone technology. Understanding laws, regulations, measurement concepts, and big data. Field applications using Unmanned Aerial Systems and Global Navigation Satellite Systems. Creation of maps and supporting documents for use in GIS. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories. Crosslisted as BRAE/NR 355.

NR 360. Ethnicity and the Land. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area C

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area C4

USCP

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one lower-division course in GE Area C. Recommended: Lower-division Ethnic Studies (ES) course and introductory natural resources course.

Comparative study of how race and culture shape landscapes, and how social hierarchies allocate the use of natural resources and the burdens of environmental pollution. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ES/NR 360. Fulfills GE Upper-Division C (GE Area C4 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and USCP.

NR 363. Undergraduate Seminar. 2 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Introduction to professional practices, including preparation of professional materials and interview skills. Review of current published research and library researching techniques in environmental science and management. Development of presentation skills. 2 seminars.

NR 365. Silviculture and Fuels Management. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR 208 and NR 315. Corequisite: NR 260; and NR 304, NR 305, or NR 306.

Applied forest ecology focusing on development of prescriptions for achieving diverse forest ecosystem management objectives. Topics include natural stand dynamics, silvicultural systems, hazardous fuels reduction, forest health assessments/diagnoses, emulating natural disturbances, and managing ecosystem services. Overnight and/or weekend field trips required. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

NR 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Individual investigation, research, studies or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 12 units.

NR 401. Disaster Recovery. 3 units

Prerequisite: CRP/NR 351.

Strategies and procedures for public sector management of recovery from disasters. Understanding the role of, and relationship between, federal, state and local agencies to provide assistance to individuals and communities in the post-disaster environment. Issues in the recovery process. 2 lectures, 1 activity. Crosslisted as CRP/NR 401.

NR 402. Forest Health. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR 208; and NR 304, 305 or NR 306; and senior standing.

Impact and losses to forested areas caused by physical and biotic agents (such as insects and diseases) other than fire; relation of direct and indirect control practices to forest management. Saturday field trips required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 404. Environmental Law. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Detailed examination of the law governing use and protection of natural resources with focus on the legal institutions entrusted with the public duty of protecting the environment. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CRP/NR 404.

NR 406. Indigenous Peoples and International Law and Policy. 4 units

Prerequisite: ES 241; and NR 141 or NR 142; and junior standing required.

Interdisciplinary examination of the evolution of international law effecting indigenous peoples in the U.S. and in the Americas. Development of international legal and sociological norms and their impact on human rights of indigenous peoples with particular attention to environmental issues. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ES/NR 406.

NR 408. Water Resource Law and Policy. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Detailed examination of the various legal systems of water use, regulation and management in California and the United States. Discussion on the key concepts and principles of state, federal and interstate water quantity and quality control; focusing on issues and problems, why conflicts occur and how solutions evolve. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CRP/NR 408.

NR 412. Senior Assessment Project. 3 units

Prerequisite: NR 326 and completion of GE Area A3 with grades of C- or better.

Principles and practices of integrated sampling and inventory of natural resource values in terrestrial ecosystems, culminating in a student project report. 2 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 413. Agricultural Law. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Analysis of agricultural law and policy including the business of agriculture, agricultural legislation, and coverage of contemporary agricultural issues such as water, food safety, and labor. Examination of statutory, judicial, policy and administrative areas in agriculture. 4 lectures.

NR 414. Sustainable Forest Management. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR 326, NR 365.

Biophysical, economic, social and political influences on optimal forest management for purposes of providing sustained yields of goods and services. Growth and yield modeling; forest investment analysis; sustainable forest production; harvest schedule modeling. Day field trip required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 416. Environmental Impact Analysis and Management. 4 units

Prerequisite: one of the following: BIO 263, NR 304, NR 305, NR 306, or SS 221.

National Environmental Policy and California Environmental Quality Acts as applied to environmental and natural resource management problems and projects. Intent, purpose and history of the laws; differences between laws identified. Request for proposals and preparation of environmental assessment documents covered. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 418. Applied GIS. 3 units

Prerequisite: LA/NR 218 or GEOG 318.

Acquisition, organization and analysis of spatial data from diverse sources using Geographic Information System (GIS) software. GIS modeling applications and validation techniques used in development and preparation of client-driven projects. 1 lecture, 2 activities.

NR 420. Watershed Assessment and Protection. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR 320; or graduate standing.

Analysis of streamflow, peak flows, and land management effects using established techniques and hydrologic models. Fluvial processes, sediment transport, and channel restoration techniques. Assessment and restoration of watersheds toward protection of aquatic and public resources. Field trip may be required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 421. Wetlands. 4 units

Prerequisite: BOT 121 or BIO 162; CHEM 127; and SS 120 or SS 130. Recommended: one of the following: BIO 327, BOT 313, BOT 326, MSCI 300, NR 304, NR 305, or NR 306.

The formation, characteristics, and functions of wetlands. Genesis of hydric soils. Plant adaptations to saturated soils. Wetlands as wildlife habitat. Policies and social issues associated with wetlands. The procedures of wetland delineations. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as BIO/NR/SS 421.

NR 422. Stream Measurements and Water Quality Monitoring. 1 unit

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Field measurement of streamflow, water quality, and water resources to support environmental evaluations of local water resources. Application of quality assurance procedures for monitoring water resources. Field trip required. Total credit limited to 2 units. 1 laboratory.

NR 425. Applied Resource Analysis and Assessment. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR 363 and NR 416.

Environmental impacts in responses to resource management, projects, programs and activities. Preparation, implementation, and coordination of environmental plans. Criteria for measurements, interpretation, and evaluation. Resource inventories, analysis, evaluation, synthesis, environmental assessment writing and preparation. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 434. Wood Properties, Products and Sustainable Uses. 4 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Principles of wood properties, green building practices, sustainable and efficient use of renewable wood resources including methods for using wood as an energy source. Field trips required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 435. Environmental Policy Analysis. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR 326. Recommended: NR 335.

Policy process approach to understanding the efforts to resolve natural resource problems in the public and private sector. Principles and techniques used to analyze the effects of environmental policies. Analysis of major federal and state environmental laws. 4 lectures.

NR 445. Systems Thinking in Environmental Management. 4 units

Prerequisite: one of the following: BIO 263, NR 305, NR 306, or SS 321. Recommended: MATH 161.

Analysis of environmental challenges by incorporating systems thinking. Emphasis on developing quantitative and modeling skills to articulate and communicate alternative solutions for advancing environmental sustainability. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 455. Wildland-Urban Fire Protection. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR 340.

Biophysical and socioeconomic issues affecting wildland fire management in urbanized landscapes. Fire risk assessment. Pre-fire prevention, mitigation, and preparedness, during-fire response, and post-fire recovery actions by public- and private-sector agencies and residents. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 465. Senior Project - Ecosystem Management. 4 units

Prerequisite: NR 326 and NR 416.

Capstone course integrating biophysical, economic and socio-political sciences. Principles, concepts and techniques designed to utilize resources while sustaining ecosystem health within acceptable limits of change. Ecosystem assessment, planning, management and monitoring project. Satisfies the senior project requirement. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

NR 471. Selected Advanced Laboratory. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 laboratories.

NR 472. Leadership Practice. 1 unit

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Tasks associated with development of personal leadership skills. Study and practice in setting goals and objectives; developing, evaluating and implementing a project independently and as part of a team; decision making and problem-solving emphasized. Total credit limited to 4 units. 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as NR/RPTA 472.

NR 474. Forest Stewardship Practices. 8 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and junior standing. Concurrent: NR 475.

Sustainable forest management, ecosystem sampling and inventory methods, photo interpretation, hydrologic resources, road condition, project impact analysis, and best management practices related to forest stewardship. Guest lecturers from industry, agencies and universities share their perspectives on forest stewardship practices. Field trip required. 5 lectures. 3 activities.

NR 475. Senior Project - Forest Stewardship. 4 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and junior standing. Concurrent: NR 474.

Sustainable forest practices and regulatory compliance issues related to Timber Harvest Plans (THP). Development of THP for specified project sites. Collection, assessment, interpretation of data culminating in production of a THP acceptable for interagency review. Satisfies senior project requirement. Field trip required. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

NR 476. Senior Project - Advanced Internship Experience in Environmental Science/Management. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and ERSC 363 or NR 306 or NR 326.

Independent internship experience conducted under faculty supervision focusing on a discipline area of environmental science/management. Completion of a project as a component of their internship. Satisfies the senior project requirement. Minimum 90 hours required. Crosslisted as ERSC/NR 476.

NR 477. Senior Project - Research Experience in Environmental Science. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and ERSC 363 or NR 306 or NR 326.

Guided research experience in a specific area of environmental science. Implementation of materials and methods. Collection, analysis and interpretation of data. Completion of formal written report. Satisfies senior project requirement. 1 lecture, 2 laboratories. Crosslisted as ERSC/NR 477.

NR 478. Senior Project - Current Topics in Environmental Science/Management. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and ERSC 363 or NR 306 or NR 326.

Critical evaluation and formal presentation of current issues in environmental science/management. Evaluation of current topics, analysis of supporting evidence, and synthesis and presentation of resulting perspectives on different approaches to current challenges in environmental science/management. Satisfies the senior project requirement. 3 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/NR 478.

NR 479. Senior Project - Independent Study. 3 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; ERSC 363 or NR 306 or NR 326; and consent of instructor.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Project results are presented in a formal report. Minimum 90 hours total time. Crosslisted as ERSC/NR 479.

NR 532. Applications in Biometrics and Econometrics. 4 units

Prerequisite: One course in undergraduate statistics, graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

Parametric and semi-parametric statistical methods in modeling biological and economic phenomena. Biometric modeling of stand growth and inventory. Econometric modeling of market and environmental values. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 534. Environmental Modeling. 3 units

Prerequisite: One course in statistics or graduate standing.

Methods and modeling approaches used in quantifying ecological and environmental processes and conditions, such as fire behavior, wildland hydrology, terrestrial and aquatic habitat condition, using GIS and other models. 2 lectures, 1 laboratory.

NR 539. Graduate Internship in Forest Resources. 1-9 units

Prerequisite: Consent of internship instructor.

Application of theory to the solution of problems of forest resources or related businesses in the field. Analyze specific management problems and perform general management assignments detailed in a contract between the student, the firm or organization, and the faculty advisor before the internship commences. Degree credit limited to 6 units.

NR 570. Selected Topics in Forest Resources. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 seminars.

NR 571. Selected Topics Forest Resources Laboratory. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory of selected topics for advanced students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 laboratories.

NR 575. Applications in Advanced Watershed Hydrology. 2 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Recommended: NR 420.

Techniques and applications in watershed hydrology to real-world projects. Projects could include water quality or quantity assessments, water quality or channel morphology monitoring, and structural and non-structural enhancements for channel and upland watersheds, culminating in a final report and presentation. 2 laboratories.

SS Courses

SS 120. Introductory Soil Science. 4 units

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area B1

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area B3

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B3

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B4

Biological, chemical, physical and genetic properties of soils. Application of scientific principles to solving land use, water management, and soil conservation problems. Interpretation of soils data for making environmental decisions, applying management practices, and sustainable food production. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Fulfills GE Areas B1 and B3 (GE Areas B3 and B4 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

SS 130. Soils in Environmental and Agricultural Systems. 4 units

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area B1

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area B3

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B3

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B4

Soils' ecological functions; soil and the water cycle; soil in production of food, fiber, and forest materials; techniques and reports of soil analyses with agricultural and environmental applications; soil quality; introductory overview of soils and civilizations. Not open to students with credit in SS 120. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Fulfills GE Areas B1 and B3 (GE Areas B3 and B4 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

SS 221. Soil Health and Plant Nutrition. 4 units

Prerequisite: SS 120 or SS 121.

Plant nutrient requirements in the context of soil health. Composition, value, and use of fertilizer materials, conditioners and agricultural minerals for sustainable crop production and environmental quality. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

SS 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 270.

SS 321. Soil Morphology. 4 units

Prerequisite: SS 120 or SS 121.

Identification of soil morphological and site properties. Correlation of soil physical and chemical properties with soil taxonomy and land use. Techniques of interpretations for agriculture, forest lands, wetlands, range lands and urban development. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

SS 322. Soil Plant Relationships. 4 units

Prerequisite: one of the following: AEPS 120, BOT 121, or SS 120; and CHEM 124 or CHEM 127.

Investigation and evaluation of soil functions. Nutrient supplying ability, conditions and processes involved in the delivery of soil functions. Effects of cultural treatments on soil fertility. Diagnostic techniques and data interpretation in soil health. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

SS 339. Internship in Environmental Earth and Soil Sciences. 1-12 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Consent of internship instructor.

Selected students will spend up to 12 weeks with an approved firm or agency engaged in work and study related to their major. A detailed written proposal and written interim and final reports required. One unit of credit may be allowed for each full week of internship. Credit/No Credit grading. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 339.

SS 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Individual investigation, research, studies or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 12 units. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 400.

SS 402. Soil, Compost, and Water Testing Enterprise. 3 units

Prerequisite: CHEM 111, CHEM 125 or CHEM 128; SS 221; and junior standing.

Experience in soil, compost, and water testing. Sampling rationale and protocol. Analyses of compost feedstocks and finished compost; monitoring for consistency. Theory and practice in use of analytical instrumentation. Interpretation of results for soil, compost, and water management. Total credit limited to 6 units for SS or ERSC majors. Total credit limited to 3 units for Soil Science minor.

SS 421. Wetlands. 4 units

Prerequisite: BOT 121 or BIO 162; CHEM 127; and SS 120 or SS 130. Recommended: one of the following: BIO 327, BOT 313, BOT 326, MSCI 300, NR 304, NR 305, or NR 306.

The formation, characteristics, and functions of wetlands. Genesis of hydric soils. Plant adaptations to saturated soils. Wetlands as wildlife habitat. Policies and social issues associated with wetlands. The procedures of wetland delineations. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as BIO/NR/SS 421.

SS 422. Soil Ecology. 4 units

Prerequisite: CHEM 212, CHEM 312, or CHEM 313; and SS 221; or graduate standing.

Biochemical activities, ecology and environmental implications of soil organisms. Effects on the formation, characteristics, and productivity of soils. Methods of studying soil organisms. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

SS 423. Environmental Soil and Water Chemistry. 5 units

Prerequisite: CHEM 129; CHEM 212, CHEM 216, CHEM 312, or CHEM 316; ERSC 223; MATH 118, MATH 141, or MATH 161; or graduate standing.

Chemical processes governing weathering, soil mineral formation and stability, common solubility equilibria. Use of chemical principles to explain surface chemical properties of soils and environmental problems in water and soil chemical systems. Preparation of professional quality reports based on laboratory data and library research. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory, 1 activity.

SS 424. Senior Project - Environmental Soil Physics. 5 units

Prerequisite: CHEM 125 or CHEM 128; MATH 141 or MATH 161; PHYS 121 or PHYS 141; SS 120; NR 363; or graduate standing.

Matter and energy in soils, with emphasis on properties and behavior of solids, water, air, and heat. Applications to agriculture, forestry, range management, engineering, and environmental sciences. Preparation of professional reports based on laboratory data and library research. Satisfies senior project requirement. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory, 1 activity. Formerly SS 432.

SS 431. Digital Soil Mapping. 4 units

Prerequisite: GEOG 318 or LA/NR 218; SS 321; STAT 217 or STAT 218; or graduate standing.

Development and production of digital soil surveys for interpretive purposes. Use of soil taxonomy, land classification systems, geographic information system (GIS) software, and geostatistics to evaluate land for best management practices. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

SS 440. Forest and Range Soils. 4 units

Prerequisite: SS 120 or SS 121; and SS 321.

Ecosystem approach to chemical, biological, physical and mechanical properties of forest and range soils. Site quality, nutrient cycling, erosion and mass movement, fire effects. Preparation of soil management reports similar to those required by various land management organizations. Overnight field trips. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

SS 444. Soil Judging. 2 units

Prerequisite: SS 321.

Morphological description of soils in the field. Taxonomic determination of classifications and interpretive properties from soil descriptions. Participation in collegiate soil judging contests. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 lecture, 1 laboratory.

SS 463. Undergraduate Seminar. 2 units

Prerequisite: SS 461.

Review of current research, experiments, and problems related to the student's major field of interest. Preparation and presentation of reports on problems or research activities. 2 seminars.

SS 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 470.

SS 471. Selected Advanced Laboratory. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 laboratories. Crosslisted as ERSC/SS 471.

SS 500. Individual Study in Soil Science. 1-6 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Advanced independent study planned and completed under the direction of a member of the Earth and Soil Sciences faculty. Total credit limited to 6 units.

SS 522. Advanced Soil Fertility. 3 units

Prerequisite: SS 221, graduate standing, or consent of instructor.

Current research frontiers in soil fertility. Evaluating soil testing philosophy, theories and interpretation. Optimizing soil conditions for maximizing crop production. Consequences of environmental pollution, trace elements and organic amendments. Use of biofertilizers, soil amendments, and enhanced efficiency fertilizers. Isotopes in soil fertility. 3 lectures.

SS 570. Selected Topics in Soil Science. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 seminars.

SS 571. Selected Advanced Laboratory. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 laboratories.

SS 582. GIS in Advanced Land Management. 3 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, NR/LA 318, or consent of instructor.

Development of plans and practices for the management of crop, range, urban and wood land. 2 seminars, 1 laboratory.

SS 599. Thesis. 1-6 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Individual research in soil science under faculty supervision, leading to a scholarly written presentation exhibiting originality, clarity, critical and independent thinking, proper analysis of data, appropriate organization and format, and accurate and thorough documentation. Six units required for the M.S. degree.