Social Sciences

Catalog Home

Faculty Office Bldg. (47), Room 13-C
Phone: 805.756.2260
https://socialsciences.calpoly.edu

Department Chair: Benjamin Funston-Timms

Academic Programs

Program name Program type
Anthropology and Geography BS, Minor
Latin American Studies Minor
Sociology BA, Minor

The Social Sciences Department offers bachelor’s degrees and minors in Anthropology-Geography and Sociology, as well as a minor in Latin American studies.

Within each major, students are required to choose a concentration relevant to their future career endeavors. The Anthropology-Geography major concentrations include cross-cultural studies and international development, environmental studies and sustainability, and human ecology. Sociology majors can choose a concentration in criminal justice, organizations, or social services.

The strength of our department lies in its focus on practical training, critical thinking, and “Learn by Doing” experiences.  Students are trained in applied technical skills including GIS, remote sensing, research design, social data collection, and qualitative/quantitative methodology.

Alongside these skills, students are encouraged to critically investigate contemporary issues, asking hard questions about society, behavior, and the environment in an increasingly diverse and global world.  Finally, students are required to bridge classroom learning with the real world through hands-on practical experience such as internships, service learning, study abroad, and senior projects.

How to Read Course Descriptions

ANT Courses

ANT 200. Special Problems for Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.

ANT 201. Cultural Anthropology. 4 units

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area D2

2019-20 or earlier: GE Area D2 or D3

Contemporary human cultures throughout the world. General patterns sought within the diversity of individual cultures. Includes such topics as: family organization; gender roles; adaptation to the environment; systems of economic exchange; political organization and leadership; religious beliefs and values; ethnicity and cultural pluralism; impact of Western culture on the developing world. Course may be offered in classroom-based, online, or hybrid format. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area D2 (GE Area D2 or GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

ANT 202. World Prehistory. 4 units

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area D2

2019-20 or earlier: GE Area D2 or D3

Development of the diverse human cultures of both the Old and New Worlds from the emergence of the first human ancestors (hominins) to the dawn of history; biological evolution, global cultural development, and adaptation before the advent of writing. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area D2 (GE Area D2 or GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

ANT 250. Biological Anthropology. 4 units

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area B2

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B2

Biological aspects of human unity and diversity. Primate and human evolution, including anatomical, physiological and behavioral adaptations. Evolutionary ecological perspectives and theories on human behavior and biology. Field trip required. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area B2.

ANT 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

ANT 309. Elements of Archaeology. 4 units

Prerequisite: ANT 202.

Archaeological method and theory covering the history and development of archaeological thought, approaches to data recovery, dating and analysis of artifacts and ecofacts, the construction of models of prehistoric human behavior through application of archaeological and anthropological theories. 4 lectures.

ANT 310. Archaeological Field Methods. 4 units

Prerequisite: ANT 202 or ANT 309.

Hands-on introduction to the methods and techniques of archaeology with an emphasis on excavation. Training in artifact and ecofact identification with a focus on lithic technology. Practical field experience with hand tools, and stratigraphic interpretation. Methodological approaches to both academic research questions and compliance with environmental planning mandates. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ANT 311. Archaeological Laboratory Methods. 4 units

Prerequisite: ANT 309 or ANT 310.

Hands-on introduction to the methods employed in post-field processing, classification, analysis, and preservation of archaeological materials. Compilation of quantitative and qualitative information in data base format to assist in the classification and interpretation of faunal remains and artifacts. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ANT 312. Introduction to Cultural Resources Management. 4 units

Prerequisite: ANT 201, ANT 202 or ANT 309.

Introduction to federal, state, and local legislation pertinent to the identification, evaluation, and treatment of cultural resources. A history of preservation legislation, culminating with detailed discussion of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the California Environmental Quality Act. Practical experience in orienteering, map-reading, and simple cartography. 4 lectures.

ANT 320. California's Native Past. 4 units

Prerequisite: ANT 202.

Overview of the paleoenvironment, prehistory, archaeology, and ethnography of Native California. The last 12,000 years of California's past from the arrival of the first human beings to the establishment of Spanish settlements in 1769, and the demise of native societies. 4 lectures.

ANT 325. Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and two lower-division courses in GE Area D.

Cultures of Mesoamerica (Mexico and Central America) from earliest times to the Spanish Conquest. Olmec, Teotihuacano, Zapotec, Maya and Aztec civilizations. Major topics include religion, politics, warfare, art, writing, calendrics, ecology and trade. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

ANT 330. Indigenous South Americans. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and two lower-division courses in GE Area D.

Indigenous peoples of South America from the past to the present. Cross-cultural study of small band societies, tribes and large civilization states located from the Amazon basin to the Altiplano. Comparison of current state of indigenous rights and place in modern society. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

ANT 344. Sex, Death, and Human Nature. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; completion of GE Area B2; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one lower-division course in GE Area D.

How Darwinian processes of differential reproduction and mortality influence human interests, passions and behaviors. Theories of inclusive fitness, parental investment and senescence. Sex differences, sexual attraction, life histories, violence and aggression, including rape, homicide and infanticide. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

ANT 345. Human Behavioral Ecology. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; completion of GE Area B2; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one lower-division course in GE Area D.

Biological and cultural influences of natural and sexual selection on individual behavior. Ecological effects on human behavior to reproduce and acquire resources. Scientific method for understanding foraging behavior, group living, social skills, kinship, parenting, religion, and mating. Cross-cultural, cross-sex, and cross-species comparisons. Course may be offered in classroom-based or online format. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

ANT 360. Human Cultural Adaptations. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and two lower-division courses in GE Area D.

Social and cultural evolution from Paleolithic times to the present. Interactions of demographic, economic and ecological factors are emphasized. Main topics include human nature/culture, sex and gender, cooperation and conflict, the 'agricultural revolution', state formation, social inequality and globalization. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

ANT 384. Professional Preparation for Anthropologists/Geographers. 1 unit

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; ANT 201 or GEOG 150.

Preparation for professional advancement in the fields of anthropology and geography. Supervised career planning emphasizing resume development, selection of an internship or international experience, exploration of career options and graduate programs. Lectures from outside, practicing professionals. Course may be offered in classroom-based or online format. Credit/No Credit grading only. 1 seminar. Formerly ANT 464.

ANT 393. Action-oriented Ethnography. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area D2 (or in GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one of the following: ANT 201, ANT 202, ANT 250, ISLA 123, any Ethnic Studies (ES) course, any Women's and Gender Studies (WGS) course.

Development of knowledge and skills needed to conduct original action-oriented ethnographic research. Grounded in the reflexive 'turn' in anthropology and critical race, science, technology and society, queer and feminist studies, students will engage questions of authority, representation, critical consciousness and justice. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ANT/ISLA 393.

ANT 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.

ANT 401. Culture and Health. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing, ANT 201, and one of the following: ANT 250, BIO 160, or BIO 263; or graduate standing.

Global perspective on the relationship between culture and health. Ecological factors influencing health and illness. Origins of disease and impact of diseases on society. Diet and nutrition. Classifications of illness causation. Kinds of curers. Relationship of gender and reproduction to illness. Pharmacology. Mental illness. Global health problems. Alternative health care modalities. Health-care needs of U.S. ethnic groups. 4 lectures.

ANT 402. Nutritional Anthropology. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and ANT 201. Recommended: ANT 250.

Interrelationships of sociocultural and ecological factors and their influence on nutrition and human health in developing and developed country contexts. Topics include human adaptation, nutritional assessment, food production and allocation, the effect of development on diet and health. 4 lectures.

ANT 415. Native American Cultures. 4 units

USCP

Prerequisite: One upper division ANT course.

Survey of Native American cultures from earliest times to present, emphasizing regional diversity in traditional lifeways. Origins of New World peoples, domestication, war, social organization, trade and gender roles. 4 lectures. Fulfills USCP.

ANT 425. Meaning, Gender, and Identity in Anthropological Theory. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and one course in GE Area D2 (or in GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs). Recommended: ANT 201.

Exploration of the intersection of anthropological theory with meaning, gender/sexuality, and identity formations within and between cultural contexts. Situate and analyze anthropological discourses regarding social meanings and cultural identities as defined by oppositions of us and other, male and female, normal and abnormal, natural and unnatural. Provide a potential source of comparative cultural reflection and critique. 4 lectures.

ANT 455. Anthropology-Geography Research Design and Methods. 4 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area B2; and two upper-division ANT or GEOG courses.

Development of knowledge and skills needed to conduct original scientific anthropology-geography research and prepares students for senior projects. Various empirical methodologies highlighted, with a focus on quantitative design and measurement of human culture, biology, behavior, environment and ecology. Course may be offered in classroom-based, online, or hybrid. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as ANT/GEOG 455.

ANT 460. Queer Anthropology. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area D2 (or in GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one of the following: ANT 201, ISLA 123, any Ethnic Studies (ES) course, any Women's and Gender Studies (WGS) course.

Exploration of intersections of queer identities and politics of race, gender, kinship, the body, class, and desire. Evaluation of how anthropology has been transformed by queer critique and knowledge production. Investigation of the multi-scaled fields of power that articulate a cultural understanding of the body. 4 lectures.

ANT 461. Senior Project I. 2 units

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Project results are presented in a formal report. Minimum 120 hours total time.

ANT 462. Senior Project II. 2 units

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Project results are presented in a formal report. Minimum 120 hours total time.

ANT 465. Internship. 3-8 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: ANT 384 or ANT 464; senior standing; and/or consent of instructor.

Supervised training, research, and work in public and private organizations. Credit/No Credit grading only. Total credit limited to 18 units.

ANT 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

ANT 471. Selected Advanced Laboratory. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 laboratories.

GEOG Courses

GEOG 150. Human Geography. 4 units

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area D2

2019-20 or earlier: GE Area D2 or D3

The interplay of cultures, places, and environments, with emphasis on diversity and globalization. Topics include characteristics and patterns of human population, migration, ethnicity, agriculture, geopolitics, language, religion, urbanization, industry, and international development. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area D2 (GE Area D2 or GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

GEOG 200. Special Problems for Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.

GEOG 218. Applications in GIS. 4 units

Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) computer software to explore environmental, natural resource, social and economic issues using spatial data. Principles of cartography and map interpretation. Development of data base and software management competencies. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories. Replaces GEOG 318.

GEOG 250. Physical Geography. 4 units

Addresses the origins and patterns of the earth's diverse assemblage of climates, landforms, biota and soils. A major focus on relationship between human cultures and these earthly environments. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 250.

GEOG 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

GEOG 308. Global Geography. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and completion of GE Area D1.

Examination of the major world regions such as Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia and Latin America. Focus on the origins and content of contemporary cultural landscapes and on their utility for understanding international differences, interactions, and current events. Particular attention to the relationship between humans and the environment. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

GEOG 325. Climate and Humanity. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Geographic perspective on the interrelationships between climate and human cultures. Effects of people on climate and the influence of climate and weather upon human activities and behavior. Focus on global human conditions which are responsible for the alteration of climate and in turn are vulnerable to climate change. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 325.

GEOG 328. Applications in Remote Sensing and GIS. 4 units

Prerequisite: GEOG 218 or NR 218.

Introduction to the use of satellite imagery to analyze natural and human features on the earth. Applications in geology, water, climate, vegetation, agriculture, and urban land use. Fundamentals of processing digital satellite images. Emphasis on bridging the earth and social sciences. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

GEOG 333. Human Impact on the Earth. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Global assessment of the impact of humans on the earth's vegetation, animals, soil, water and atmosphere. Emphasis on problems stemming from the interactions of human attitudes, technologies, and population with natural resources. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 333.

GEOG 340. Geography of California. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Analysis of the land and people of California from a geographical perspective. Patterns of environment, history, settlement, water, agriculture, ethnicity, economy, politics, and urban growth. Current issues are examined in a national and global context. 4 lectures.

GEOG 350. The Global Environment. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area B5, B6, or B7

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Interdisciplinary investigation of how human activities impact the Earth's environment on a global scale. Examination of population, resource use, climate change, and biodiversity from scientific/technical and social/economic/ historical/political perspectives. Use of remote sensing maps. Sustainable solutions. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as AG/EDES/ENGR/GEOG/ISLA/SCM/UNIV 350. Fulfills GE Area Upper-Division B (GE Areas B5, B6, or B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog).

GEOG 370. Geography of Latin America. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one course in GE Area D2 (or in GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Geographic analysis of the lands and peoples of Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America. Patterns of environment, culture, politics, economy, and development. Issues (local, regional, and global) shaping Latin America today, with emphasis on U.S.-Latin America relations. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

GEOG 380. Geography of the Caribbean. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and two lower-division courses in GE Area D.

Geographic analysis of the Caribbean including the Greater Antilles, Lesser Antilles, and the Caribbean coasts of Central and South America. Investigates patterns and relationships between the physical and cultural geographies from local, regional, and global perspectives. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

GEOG 384. Professional Preparation for Anthropologists/Geographers. 1 unit

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; ANT 201 or GEOG 150.

Preparation for professional advancement in the fields of anthropology and geography. Supervised career planning emphasizing resume development, selection of an internship or international experience, exploration of career options and graduate programs. Lectures from outside, practicing professionals. Credit/No Credit grading only. 1 seminar. Formerly GEOG 464.

GEOG 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.

GEOG 408. Geography of International Development. 4 units

Prerequisite: GEOG 308.

Detailed analysis of international development from a geographical perspective. Survey of various theories of development and their cultural and ecological components at multiple geographic scales, including institutions and actors involved. Applicable skills for development research and practice, emphasizing sustainability. 4 lectures.

GEOG 414. Global and Regional Climatology. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

The earth's pattern of climates and the physical processes that account for them. Focus on interrelationships between climate and the physical/biological and cultural environments. Special emphasis on modern climate changes and their consequences. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 414.

GEOG 415. Applied Meteorology and Climatology. 4 units

Prerequisite: ERSC/GEOG 250.

Physical processes in the atmosphere that determine regional weather, climate and climate variability. Surface and satellite systems for weather observation, and weather/climate modeling. Dynamics of weather systems, including thunderstorms and hurricanes. Emphases on weather/climate affecting agriculture and other human activities. 3 lectures, 1 activity. Crosslisted as ERSC/GEOG 415.

GEOG 435. Biodiversity and Biogeography Methods. 4 units

Prerequisite: ERSC/GEOG 250.

Origins and spatial patterns of the earth's flora and fauna across gradients of climate, landforms, geology and time. Will focus on the history of biogeography and new applications of geospatial technology such as GIS and remote sensing. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

GEOG 441. Advanced Applications in Geospatial Technologies. 4 units

Prerequisite: GEOG 218 or LA/NR 218. Recommended: BRAE 345 or GEOG 328.

Advanced applications in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing, and other geospatial technologies. Emphasizing research, methodologies, and career fields in geography, earth sciences, and the social sciences. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

GEOG 455. Anthropology-Geography Research Design and Methods. 4 units

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area B2; and two upper-division ANT or GEOG courses.

Development of knowledge and skills needed to conduct original scientific anthropology-geography research and prepares students for senior projects. Various empirical methodologies highlighted, with a focus on quantitative design and measurement of human culture, biology, behavior, environment and ecology. Course may be offered in classroom-based, online, or hybrid. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as ANT/GEOG 455.

GEOG 461. Senior Project I. 2 units

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Project results are presented in a formal report. Minimum 120 hours total time.

GEOG 462. Senior Project II. 2 units

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Project results are presented in a formal report. Minimum 120 hours total time.

GEOG 465. Internship. 3-8 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: GEOG 464, senior standing and/or consent of instructor.

Supervised training, research, and work in public and private organizations. Credit/No Credit grading only. Total credit limited to 18 units.

GEOG 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

SOC Courses

SOC 110. Comparative Societies. 4 units

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area D2

2019-20 or earlier: GE Area D2 or D3

Introduction to sociological theory and methods, emphasizing a comparative analysis of social institutions of contemporary societies in major world regions, including the family, religion, politics, and the economy. Direct comparisons made between American social institutions and those of other societies, their histories, social problems and social change. Course may be offered in classroom-based or online format. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area D2 (GE Area D2 or GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

SOC 111. Social Problems. 4 units

An introduction to sociology with an emphasis on problems inherent in selected social institutions. Instruction in social analysis, including theories of social problems, how those problems are studied, and a survey of possible solutions. 4 lectures.

SOC 200. Special Problems for Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.

SOC 216. US Race and Ethnic Relations. 4 units

USCP

Recommended: SOC 110.

Exploration of U.S. ethnic minorities' experiences and related contemporary issues. Sources and manifestations of economic and social discrimination patterns and how they affect individual and group life chances. Replaces SOC 316. 4 lectures. Fulfills USCP.

SOC 218. International Political Economy. 4 units

2020-21 or later catalog: GE Area D2

2019-20 or earlier: GE Area D2 or D3

Principles of international political economy in their social and cultural context. Sociological perspectives on the historical development of the world system and the current patterns of global inequality. Comparison of the political economy of major nations and their relation to the overall world system. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area D2 (GE Area D2 or GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

SOC 222. Classical Social Theory. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 110.

Overview of classical sociological theory. How foundational sociologists developed and delimited the field of sociology. Practice in application of classical social theory in relation to different aspects of social life. Examination of basic assumptions and comparison of different perspectives. Replaces SOC 421. 4 lectures.

SOC 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

SOC 301. Social Work and Social Welfare Institutions. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 110. Recommended: Junior standing.

Introduction to the field of social welfare. Development of social work and social welfare services; major issues in social service policy. Scope and diversity of specific programs in the social services. Analysis of current programs and the recipients of welfare services. Field trip may be required. 4 lectures.

SOC 302. Criminology. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 110.

Sociological theory and research on crime, criminality, and victimization in the United States. Critical analysis of crime, including how we define, study, and try to reduce and stop crime in our communities. Classic and contemporary perspectives on punishment, deterrence, and restorative justice are covered. 4 lectures.

SOC 305. Social Movements. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 110.

Description and analysis of social movements in contemporary societies as they relate to major revolutionary changes historically and in the present. Analysis of variables producing social movements and political violence, including terrorism. Impact on society. 4 lectures.

SOC 306. Sociology of the Family. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 110 or SOC 111. Recommended: Junior standing.

Family stages, relationships and strengths. Alternative and diverse forms of families. Courtship, marriage, parenting, launching children and aging. Horizontal stressors (trauma and divorce) vs. vertical stressors (racism and poverty). 4 lectures.

SOC 308. Sociology of the Environment. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 110.

Complex interactions between society and environment. Cultural relationships with nature. Environmental movements, food security, population growth. Local and global inequities regarding consumption, toxins, sea level rise, and natural disasters. Emphasis on environmental justice: race, class, and gender. 4 lectures.

SOC 309. The World System and Its Problems. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 110. Recommended: Junior standing.

Analysis of the historical background, structure, and dynamics of the world system; examines such issues as the origins of Third World poverty, colonialism, the changes in the world's dominant economic powers, the fall of communism, the growing economic competition between Europe, North America, and Asia; and possible strategies for the economic development of the Third World. 4 lectures.

SOC 310. Self, Organizations and Society. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Analysis of the interactions relating to the development of self. Examination of the reciprocal interactions between biology, personal environment, and society. 4 lectures.

SOC 311. Sociology of Genders and Sexualities. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Analysis of social constructions of sex, genders, and sexualities. Explores how gender stereotypes are created and reproduced. Focus on media representations; intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality; and effects on individuals and structures of work, education, family, and abusive relationships. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as SOC/WGS 311.

SOC 315. Global Race and Ethnic Relations. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one course in GE Area D2 (or in GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Diverse structures of unequal relationships among racial and ethnic groups in several countries including the United States. Theories about sources of economic and social discrimination and colonialism. Focus on the concept of ethnicity. Evaluation methods to restructure race and ethnic relations. International case histories. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

SOC 321. Migration. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

USCP

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one course in GE Area D2 (or in GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Critical examination of migration, with emphasis on migration to and within the United States. Social and economic impacts on sending communities, receiving communities, and migrants themselves. Grounded in migration theory. Comparisons between current and historical migration trends and policies. Course may be offered in classroom-based or online format. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and USCP.

SOC 323. Social Stratification. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Social class and the distribution of income, wealth, status and power in society, with emphasis on contemporary United States; social mobility; race, gender, and ethnic inequalities; political power and the nature of welfare; the nature, causes and solutions to poverty. 4 lectures.

SOC 326. Sociology of the Life Cycle. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one course in GE Area D2 (or in GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Change and continuity of the self through the life course. Impact of aging on the physical, emotional, intellectual and social aspects of well being, and how this knowledge can be applied to enhance the quality of life. Course may be offered in classroom-based or online format. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

SOC 327. Social Change. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

USCP

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one lower-division course in GE Area D. Recommended: HIST 216 or SOC 305.

Compares and contrasts social change strategies over time and across diverse social problems, focusing mainly on the U.S., but not exclusively. Theoretical and critical examination of contemporary efforts to address restricted opportunities by groups who have been historically marginalized due to race/ethnicity, lower socioeconomic status, sexuality, or other social identities. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and USCP.

SOC 343. Contemporary Societies of the Developing World. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and one course in GE Area D2 (or in GE Area D3 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs). Recommended: SOC 110.

Investigation of societies in developing countries, from broad regional trends to community-specific case studies. Gender, race, education, health, aging, families, inequality, and resilience. Readings and films emphasize voices from within the focal communities. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

SOC 354. Qualitative Research Methods. 4 units

Prerequisite: Two Sociology courses. Recommended: Junior standing.

Qualitative data collection for social research. The relationship among theory research and hypothesis testing. Data collection techniques: content analysis, face to face interviews, and ethnographic methods. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

SOC 355. Quantitative Research Methods. 4 units

Prerequisite: STAT 217; and two Sociology courses. Recommended: Junior standing.

The basics of how to do quantitative social research. Includes topics on data collection techniques such as surveys, experiments, and the use of existing data. Also includes topics on univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis and the use of SPSS for data analysis. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

SOC 377. Sociology of Religion. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area D

2019-20 or earlier catalog: GE Area D5

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and two lower-division courses in GE Area D.

Religion from a sociological perspective. Topics may include the nature of religious experience, the role of religion in politics, economics, and social change, and the role that social forces have in influencing religious beliefs and practices. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division D (GE Area D5 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

SOC 395. Sociology of Complex Organizations. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Bureaucracies and informal organizations from a sociological perspective. Organizational networks within and between organizations, relationship between organizations and their environment, and organizational socialization and career patterns, and gender and race or ethnic differences in organizational patterns. 4 lectures.

SOC 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.

SOC 402. Crime and Violence. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Criminal behavior of individuals and groups; special categories include drug use, sex offenders, property crime, syndicated crime, interpersonal violence, and white-collar criminality. Legal definitions of crime and their implications, theories of causation, the sources of criminological data, and possible responses to the problems posed by criminal behavior. 4 lectures.

SOC 406. Juvenile Justice and Delinquency. 4 units

Prerequisite: One course in sociology.

Sociological examination of juvenile delinquency as a social and legal concept, covering the nature, volume and social distribution of juvenile crime; the formal structure of juvenile justice; and how justice for juveniles is applied in practice. 4 lectures.

SOC 412. Criminology & Criminal Justice. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

A sociological perspective of contemporary crime and criminal justice issues, such as racial profiling, drug enforcement, and mass incarceration. Incorporates criminological theory to examine the nature, function, and causes of crime in society. Focuses on the control and treatment strategies of adult offenders. 4 lectures.

SOC 414. Theories of Social Work in Counseling Agencies. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 110 or SOC 111. Recommended: Junior standing.

Introduction to social work counseling/casework. Bio-psychological-social/strengths perspective: theories, skills, values, clinical knowledge. Possible career paths/agency settings. Traditional and innovative therapy techniques. Field trip may be required. 4 seminars.

SOC 420. Practical Interviewing and Counseling Skills in Social Work. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 413 or SOC 414.

Practical skills for interviewing, assessing and counseling clients. Hands-on practice and role play. Techniques to establish rapport, evaluate mental status and develop appropriate goals. Required documentation standards in social work agencies. Useful skill sets for medical or research interviewing. 4 seminars.

SOC 421. Social Theory. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 111.

Classical and modern social theory including conflict, symbolic interactionist, and feminist perspectives among others. Importance of theories for understanding present social arrangements and problems. 4 lectures.

SOC 423. Gender and Work. 4 units

USCP

Prerequisite: Junior standing; and completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better.

Extent, causes, and intersectional nature of workplace gender inequality. Strategies aimed at creating more egalitarian organizations. Topics include job segregation, tokenism, sexual harassment, work/family balance, gendered jobs, inequality regimes, personnel policies, workplace democracy, and social/labor movement activism. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as SOC/WGS 423. Fulfills USCP.

SOC 431. World Population Processes and Problems. 4 units

Prerequisite: SOC 110 or ANT 201. Recommended: SOC 354; SOC 355; or ANT/GEOG 455.

Introduction to demography, emphasizing historical patterns and impacts of population change. Is population a problem? Topics include fertility, mortality, the demographic transition, food security, environmental degradation, population control, population aging, intergenerational transfers, and migration. 4 lectures.

SOC 440. Internship. 2-8 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Recommended: Junior standing.

Supervised training, research, and work in public and private organizations. Credit/No Credit grading only. Total credit limited to 12 units.

SOC 444. Incarceration and Society: Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing, SOC 402 or SOC 412, and consent of instructor.

Compares and contrasts perspectives on the criminal justice system in dialogue with inmates. Examination of the social construction of deviance and inequality in the life course that may lead to incarceration. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

SOC 461. Senior Project I. 2 units

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Project results are presented in a formal report. Minimum 120 hours total time.

SOC 462. Senior Project II. 2 units

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Project results are presented in a formal report. Minimum 120 hours total time.

SOC 464. Professional Development for Sociologists. 1 unit

CR/NC

Prerequisite: SOC 110 and Junior standing.

Preparation for professional advancement in the field of Sociology. Supervised career planning emphasizing resume development, selection of an internship or international experience, exploration of career options and graduate programs. Lectures from outside, practicing professionals. 1 lecture. Credit/No Credit grading only.

SOC 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.