Mechanical Engineering

Catalog Home

Engineering Bldg. (13), Room 254
Phone: 805.756.1334
https://me.calpoly.edu

Department Chair: James Widmann

Engineering Student Services
Engineering South (40), Room 115
Phone: 805.756.1461

Academic Programs

Program name Program type
Mechanical Engineering BS, MS

Mission Statement

To impart knowledge in the art and science of mechanical engineering through a comprehensive curriculum true to the traditional Cal Poly learn-by-doing philosophy that produces mechanical engineers of high ethics and skill, fully prepared for entry into industry, government, graduate school and private enterprise.

Program Educational Objectives

A mechanical engineering alumnus will:

  1. Research, design, develop, test, evaluate, or implement engineering solutions to problems that are of a complexity encountered in professional practice.
  2. Communicate and perform as an effective engineering professional in both individual and team-based project environments.
  3. Recognize and determine the ethical implications and societal impacts of engineering solutions.
  4. Continuously improve through lifelong learning.

Program Description

The profession of mechanical engineering is directed toward the design, manufacture, and system integration of a very wide variety of equipment ranging from manufacturing machinery and power generation equipment to consumer goods. Of central concern to mechanical engineers is the sound application of basic principles of solid mechanics, fluid mechanics and thermal sciences in the design, manufacture, and application of this equipment. Mechanical Engineering graduates obtain employment primarily with manufacturers, energy companies, consultants, and government agencies. Types of work performed by graduates include product design, mechanical design, testing, engineering management, engineering sales, design of manufacturing systems, and development of maintenance procedures. Mechanical Engineering graduates also often enhance their careers through graduate study in engineering, and some students also study engineering to build a scientific and technical foundation as a prelude to enrollment in medical, law, and business schools.

The focus of the Cal Poly Mechanical Engineering program is on education based on our "learn by doing" educational philosophy. Thus, the curriculum includes a large number of hands-on laboratories, integration of design throughout, and a senior project requirement for all students. Students are enrolled in engineering laboratories in all years of the curriculum. The program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

The Mechanical Engineering Department is the home of the Donald E. Bently Center for Engineering Innovation. The center provides support for faculty, students, and visiting scholars for the advancement of research, education, and practice in mechanical engineering. A $6 million endowment to fund three professorships supports the center.

Upper division students in the General Concentration (Degree Requirements and Curriculum) can choose professional elective courses from such courses as turbomachinery, robotics, mechatronics, composite materials, rotor dynamics, advanced mechanics, solar systems, internal combustion engines, heat and mass transfer, and courses emphasizing the petroleum, air conditioning, ventilating, and refrigeration industries. Students in the Mechatronics Concentration (Degree Requirements and Curriculum) are prepared for professional practice in the design of “intelligent” products for use in factory automation, robotics, hybrid vehicles, alternative energy, and many other fields. The HVAC&R Concentration (Degree Requirements and Curriculum) prepares students for careers in the heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) industry, with a focus on the design of mechanical systems for commercial and industrial buildings. Manufacturing Concentration (Degree Requirements and Curriculum) students focus on fabrication processes, preparing them for careers designing or manufacturing a wide variety of consumer and industrial products. The Energy Resources Concentration (Degree Requirements and Curriculum) prepares students for careers in renewable and nonrenewable energy companies producing electrical power, with the focus on the design, manufacture, and system integration of power and fuel plants.

There are several organized student clubs associated with the Mechanical Engineering Department, including national honor societies and student chapters of professional societies. Each of these clubs offers students active programs and leadership activities.

Undergraduate Program

BS Mechanical Engineering

The profession of mechanical engineering is directed toward the design, manufacture, and system integration of a very wide variety of equipment ranging from manufacturing machinery and power generation equipment to consumer goods.

Concentrations

  • General Concentration
  • Energy Resources Concentration
  • Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning and Refrigerating Concentration (HVAC&R)
  • Mechatronics Concentration
  • Manufacturing Concentration

Degree Requirements and Curriculum

Graduate Program

MS Mechanical Engineering

The masters program of the Mechanical Engineering department at Cal Poly is designed to prepare its graduates with skill and knowledge to be able to work as an engineer in research and development, analysis, or design of products and systems, or to continue toward a PhD degree from other institutions. Due to the nature of the masters degree, students can select an area of emphasis based on their interest, or alternately, choose courses in a variety of different areas that gives them significant breath of knowledge. At Cal Poly, masters degree candidates can select a thesis option or a non-thesis option. The thesis option gives the candidates a more thorough knowledge in the area in which they do their research. The non-thesis option gives the candidates a more diverse knowledge from additional courses.

Prerequisites

For admission as a classified graduate student, in addition to the University requirements, an applicant should hold a BS degree in Mechanical Engineering with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. Other closely related majors may be accepted as conditionally classified graduate students if they have had an adequate number of prerequisite classes to successfully fulfill the requirements. Up to 12 units of remedial courses may be taken at Cal poly. For additional information on University requirements, please refer to the Graduate Programs of this catalog.

Two program options are available:

Thesis option. 36 units of advisor-approved coursework, 9 units of thesis research/design, and an oral thesis defense examination.

Non-thesis option. 45 units of advisor-approved coursework and a written comprehensive examination.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum

Blended BS + MS Mechanical Engineering Program

A blended program provides an accelerated route to a graduate professional degree, with simultaneous conferring of both Bachelor's and Master's degrees. Students in the blended program are provided with a seamless process whereby they can progress from undergraduate to graduate status. Up to 8 units of technical electives (400-level or higher) that were used in meeting the undergraduate degree requirements can also be used for credit toward meeting the graduate degree requirements.

Eligibility

Majors that are eligible for the blended program are:

  • BS Aerospace Engineering
  • BS Mechanical Engineering

Participation in a blended program is based upon prior academic performance and other measures of professional promise. Refer to Graduate Education for more information and for the minimum criteria required to be eligible for a blended program at Cal Poly. Contact the Graduate Program Coordinator in the Mechanical Engineering department for any additional eligibility criteria.

How to Read Course Descriptions

ME Courses

ME 128. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering I. 1 unit

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering student; first quarter of freshman year. Concurrent: ME 163.

Introduction to mechanical engineering and its application in professional practice. Includes design, analysis, testing and dissection of mechanical engineering systems, from simple machines to more complicated systems. Introduction to engineering graphic communication. Introduction to HVAC, Manufacturing and Mechatronics concentrations. Includes cornerstone service learning project. 1 laboratory.

ME 129. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering II. 1 unit

Prerequisite: ME 128; Mechanical Engineering student; second quarter of freshman year. Concurrent: IME 145.

Communication of designs for manufacturing using basic definitions of points, lines and planes in space. Pictorials, orthographic projection, section views and auxiliary views. Techniques from geometry and spatial definitions integrated to provide information to both the design and manufacturing processes. 1 laboratory.

ME 130. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering III. 1 unit

Prerequisite: ME 129; Mechanical Engineering student; third quarter of freshman year. Corequisite: IME 146.

Use of computer-aided design to communicate parts and assemblies. Dimensioned drawings for part fabrication. Introduction to fits and tolerances. Layout drawings and functional assemblies. 1 laboratory.

ME 161. Introduction to Composite Materials Manufacturing. 2 units

Reinforcing fibers and matrix materials both synthetic and natural. Composite material molding and forming processes including hand layup, autoclave, compression molding, filament winding, and vacuum infusion molding. Mold, mandrel or tooling design. Composite component post-processing and machining. 2 laboratories.

ME 163. Freshmen Orientation to Mechanical Engineering. 1 unit

Concurrent: ME 128.

Introduction to career opportunities in Mechanical Engineering, exploration of the ethical responsibilities of being a student and professional engineer, and familiarization with the Mechanical Engineering curriculum including cooperative education and international exchange opportunities. Cornerstone service learning project. Field trip may be required. 1 activity.

ME 211. Engineering Statics. 3 units

Prerequisite: MATH 241 (or concurrently), PHYS 131 or PHYS 141.

Analysis of forces on engineering structures in equilibrium. Properties of forces, moments, couples, and resultants. Equilibrium conditions, friction, centroids, area moments of inertia. Introduction to mathematical modeling and problem solving. Vector mathematics where appropriate. 3 lectures. Crosslisted as HNRS/ME 211.

ME 212. Engineering Dynamics. 3 units

Prerequisite: MATH 241; ME 211 or ARCE 211.

Analysis of motions of particles and rigid bodies encountered in engineering. Velocity, acceleration, relative motion, work, energy, impulse, and momentum. Further development of mathematical modeling and problem solving. Vector mathematics where appropriate. 3 lectures. Crosslisted as HNRS 214/ME 212.

ME 228. Engineering Design Communication. 2 units

Use of engineering communication principles to communicate details of project designs including: sketching, orthographic projection, section and auxiliary views, dimensioning, and tolerances. Hand and computer based methods explored. Introduction to design for manufacturability. 2 laboratories.

ME 229. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering for Transfers. 2 units

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering and its application in professional practice. Includes design, analysis, testing and dissection of mechanical engineering systems. Investigation of personal and professional ethics. Familiarization with the ME curriculum including cooperative education and international exchange opportunities. 1 lecture, 1 laboratory.

ME 234. Philosophy of Design. 3 units

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

General approach to the meaning of engineering design. Conceptual blocks, creativity, design process, design considerations and elements. 3 lectures.

ME 236. Measurement and Engineering Data Analysis. 3 units

Prerequisite: Engineering majors. Recommended: CHEM 125, ENGL 149, and PHYS 132.

Introduction to principles and practice of measurement. Application of probability distributions, sampling, confidence intervals, uncertainty, and regression analysis to engineering experiments and design. Techniques for measuring common physical quantities such as temperature, pressure, and strain. Introduction to laboratory report writing and communication of technical data. 2 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 251. Introduction to Detailed Design with Solid Modeling. 2 units

Prerequisite: ME 130 or ME 228. Recommended: IME 143.

Part and system or assembly design with solid modeling using current software and hardware. Techniques of advanced communication including weld symbols, threaded fasteners, dimensioning and tolerancing. Creation of design layouts and part models with varied configurations and dynamic assembly models. Introduction to section mass and inertia properties. Emphasis of group work and peer review in the production of parts for assemblies. 1 lecture, 1 laboratory.

ME 263. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering for Transfer Students. 1 unit

Introduction to mechanical engineering and its application in professional practice. Investigation of personal and professional ethics. Familiarization with the ME curriculum including cooperative education and international exchange opportunities. 1 lecture.

ME 264. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering for Transfers Lab. 1 unit

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering and its application in professional practice. Includes design, analysis, testing and dissection of mechanical engineering systems. 1 laboratory.

ME 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

ME 271. Selected Laboratory. 1-2 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 4 units. 1 to 2 laboratories.

ME 302. Thermodynamics I. 3 units

Prerequisite: ME 212 and PHYS 132.

Properties of working fluids and fundamental relations for processes involving the transfer of energy. First and second laws of thermodynamics, irreversibility and availability. 3 lectures.

ME 303. Thermodynamics II. 3 units

Prerequisite: ME 302.

Vapor and gas power cycles, refrigeration cycles, thermodynamic relations, psychrometrics, and chemical reactions. 3 lectures.

ME 305. Introduction to Mechatronics. 4 units

Prerequisite: EE 201 and EE 251.

Introduction to microcontrollers and assembly language programming. Emphasis on components and techniques for interfacing that are typical of embedded microcontroller applications (A/D conversion, D/A conversion, interrupts, timers, and pulse-width modulation). Laboratory exercises involve real-time interfacing of microcontrollers to external mechanical and/or electromechanical devices. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 313. Engineering Principles in Everyday Life. 4 units

GE Area Area B7

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

GE Area Area F

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; one course in GE Area B4 with a grade of C- or better (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs); and MATH 118 or equivalent. Recommended: PHYS 121.

Discover engineering principles and concepts such as natural frequencies, entropy, Coriolis acceleration, and Faraday's Law that govern our everyday lives, many aspects of human body, and consumer products. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division B (GE Area B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog; GE Area F for students on earlier catalogs).

ME 318. Mechanical Vibrations. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 212, MATH 344. Recommended: EE 201.

Free and forced vibration response of single and multiple degree of freedom systems. Experimental studies of the dynamic behavior of structures and machines. Instrumentation methods utilized in field and laboratory. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 320. Consumer Energy Guide. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

2019-20 catalog: GE Area B7

2017-19 or earlier catalog: GE Area F

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Interdisciplinary connection of everyday consumer decisions with energy costs, security, and global warming. Energy consumption by home appliances and automobiles. Methods to reduce the individual 'energy footprint' with renewable energy, purchasing carbon offsets, and behavioral modifications. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division B (GE Area B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog; GE Area F for students on earlier catalogs).

ME 322. Introduction to System Dynamics. 4 units

Prerequisites: CPE/CSC 101 or CSC 231 or CSC 234; EE 201; EE 251; ME 318; ME 341.

Unified approach for mathematical modeling and numerical analysis of dynamic physical systems that store energy in multiple domains. Emphasis on developing lumped-parameter linear models from primitive elements in a systematic manner. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 323. Everything is Designed: The Invention and Evolution of Products. 4 units

2020-21 or later: Upper-Div GE Area B

2019-20 catalog: GE Area B7

2017-19 or earlier catalog: GE Area F

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with grades of C- or better; and completion of GE Areas B1 through B4, with a grade of C- or better in one course in GE Area B4 (GE Area B1 for students on the 2019-20 or earlier catalogs).

Investigation of engineering product designs, including social, environmental, and technological influences. Incorporation of engineering design tools to develop a product using creative methods and design methodology. Exploration of creative problem solving methods and barriers to creativity. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Upper-Division B (GE Area B7 for students on the 2019-20 catalog; GE Area F for students on earlier catalogs).

ME 326. Intermediate Dynamics. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 212; CPE/CSC 101 or CSC 231 or CSC 234. Corequisite: MATH 244.

Continuation of ME 212. Additional analysis of planar motion of rigid bodies with particular attention to rotating reference frames. Kinematics of linkages, three dimensional dynamics, introduction to numerical methods and dynamic simulation of mechanisms. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

ME 328. Design for Strength and Stiffness. 4 units

Prerequisite: BMED 212 or ME 234; CE 207; CPE/CSC 101 or CSC 231 or CSC 234; MATE 210; ME 212; and ME 251. Corequisite: IME 141 or ITP 341 or ME 161.

Design of machine parts by stress and deflection. Effects of fluctuating stresses and stress concentration. Design of shafts and other machine parts. Modern industrial design practice using standard components and design layout drawings. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 329. Mechanical Systems Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 328.

Design of mechanical equipment and systems using various machine elements and components such as threaded fasteners, power screws, springs, gears, bearings, clutches, prime movers, etc. Decision modeling based on technical and economic feasibility. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 341. Fluid Mechanics I. 3 units

Prerequisite: MATH 242 or MATH 244; ME 212.

Fluid properties and fluid statics. Euler and Bernoulli equations. Conservation equations; dimensional analysis. Viscous pipe flow. Course may be offered in classroom-based or online format. 3 lectures.

ME 347. Fluid Mechanics II. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 236, ME 341, ME 302.

Conservation equations of fluid dynamics. Viscous flow, boundary layer concepts, lift and drag, compressible flow, turbomachinery. Laboratory measurement of turbomachine performance, velocity profiles, boundary layers on surfaces. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 350. Heat Transfer. 4 units

Prerequisite: CPE/CSC 101 or CSC 231 or CSC 234; MATE 360 and MATE 380, or ME 236 and ME 302 and ME 341.

Basic principles of heat transfer by conduction and convection. Laboratory experiments to characterize thermodynamic material properties, energy conversion processes, thermodynamic cycles, and performance of heat transfer equipment. Not open to students with credit in ME 343. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 359. Fundamentals of HVAC Systems. 4 units

Corequisite: ME 302.

Fundamentals of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, human comfort and indoor air quality, primary and secondary systems and components. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 4 units.

ME 401. Stress Analysis. 4 units

Prerequisite: CE 207, MATH 344, ME 328 or consent of instructor.

Advanced strength of materials: behavior of disks, plates, and shells. Theory of elasticity. Energy methods. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 402. Orthopedic Biomechanics. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 328.

Biomechanical analysis of the musculoskeletal system. Emphasis on the use of statics, dynamics, strength of materials, viscoelasticity, and poroelasticity to analyze the mechanical loads acting on human joints, the mechanical properties of tissues, and the design of artificial joints. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 403. Access by Design: Introduction to Rehabilitation Engineering. 4 units

Prerequisite: CE 204 and ME 212.

Project-based course focused on the design and analysis of systems to assist people with disabilities. Workplace assistance, mobility aids, educational accommodations, assistive technology and adaptive sports. Universal design, empathy in design, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the social model of disability. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 404. Applied Finite Element Analysis. 4 units

Prerequisite: BMED 410, and CE 207 or CE 208; or CE 406; or ME 328.

Finite element based solutions to engineering problems with an emphasis on elastostatic problems in structural mechanics. The power and pitfalls associated with the finite element method highlighted through practical modeling assignments. Introduces the use of commercial finite element codes. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as BMED/CE/ME 404.

ME 405. Mechatronics. 4 units

Prerequisite: EE 321, EE 361, ME 305, and ME 329 (ME329 may be taken concurrently); or CPE 316 or CPE/EE 329 or CPE/EE 336.

Microprocessor applications in machine control and product design. Applied electronics. Drive technology; transducers and electromechanical systems. Real-time programming. Mechatronic design methodology. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 409. Interdisciplinary Study in Biomechanics. 4 units

Prerequisite: BMED 410 and CE 207; or KINE 403; or ME 326.

Examination of human motion biomechanics. Experimental and analytical methods in motion analysis based on rigid body dynamics. Protocols for protection of human subjects in research. Hypothesis-driven research in interdisciplinary teams, including written proposal development and written/oral communication of results to a scientific audience. 1 lecture, 3 activities. Crosslisted as BMED/KINE/ME 409.

ME 410. Experimental Methods in Mechanical Design I. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 328. Recommended: ME 318.

Bonded resistance strain gages for static and dynamic measurements; rosettes, bridge circuits, lead wire effects, special gages. Data acquisition systems, and measurement of displacement, velocity, and acceleration. Photoelastic methods including birefringent coatings. Applications in mechanical design and metrology. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 412. Composite Materials Analysis and Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: AERO 331 or ME 328.

Behavior of unidirectional fiber composites. Properties of short-fiber composites, and orthotropic lamina. Analysis of laminated composites. Strength and hygrothermal behavior of composite materials. Structural optimization. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 415. Energy Conversion. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 302.

Engineering aspects of energy sources, conversion and storage. Topics selected from fossil fuel systems, nuclear power, thermoelectric systems, thermionic converters, fuel cells, magnetohydrodynamic generators, and geothermal, tidal, wind and ocean temperature energy conversion systems. 4 lectures.

ME 416. Ground Vehicle Dynamics and Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 318, ME 328.

Design of ground vehicles for directional stability and control. Tire mechanics and their effects on vehicle performance. Simulation of vehicle dynamics using digital computer. Synthesis of steering mechanism and suspension system. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 418. Implementation of Mechanical Controls. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 322.

Analysis, design, and implementation of automated controllers for mechanical systems. Experimental measurement of dynamic properties and creation of system models. Analysis and simulation of the effect of control strategies on system dynamics. Design of closed-loop control systems, including control of dynamic properties and implementation using common embedded computing hardware. Not open to students with credit in ME 419 or ME 422. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 419. Advanced Control Systems. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 322, ME 236.

Modeling and control of physical systems. Design of mechanical, hydraulic and electrical feedback control systems using time response, transfer function, frequency response, state space and computer simulation. Address state feedback, observability and controllability of multi-input, multi-output systems. Not open to students with credit in ME 418 or ME 422. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 420. Thermal System Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 303; ME 347; and ME 350.

Radiation and combined mode heat transfer. Design of thermal systems. Engineering economics, thermal component sizing, and steady-state simulation techniques applied to the design and performance analysis of thermal systems. Not open to students with credit in ME 440. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 422. Mechanical Control Systems. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 318.

Modeling and control of physical systems. Design of mechanical, hydraulic and electrical systems using time response, frequency response, state space, and computer simulation. Not open to students with credit in ME 418 or ME 419. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 423. Robotics: Fundamentals and Applications. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 326; ME 418 or ME 419 or ME 422.

Introduction to robots and their types. Homogeneous transformations. Kinematic equations and their solutions. Motion trajectories, statics, dynamics, and control of robots. Robot programming. Actuators, sensors and vision systems. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 428. Senior Design Project I. 2 units

Prerequisite: ME 329. Corequisite: ME 318 and ME 350.

First of three courses taken sequentially in component and system design using real-world problems. Small teams study and apply techniques of the engineering design process including problem definition, concept generation, feasibility studies and decision making. Practice of professional skills including written and oral communication, teaming, project management, societal responsibility and ethics. 2 laboratories.

ME 429. Senior Design Project II. 2 units

Prerequisite: ME 428.

Continuation of a project begun in ME 428. Activities focused on detail design, analysis and material procurement. 2 laboratories.

ME 430. Senior Design Project III. 2 units

Prerequisite: ME 429.

Completion of a project begun in ME 428 and continued in ME 429. Design verified through prototyping and testing. 2 laboratories.

ME 431. Mechanical Design Techniques. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 329.

Comprehensive study of various design methods and techniques. Techniques used to explore various structural concepts such as prestressing, shaping, sizing, etc. Simulation of systems using digital computer. Design criteria identification of design parameters and constraints. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 434. Enhanced Oil Recovery. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 302, ME 347, and ME 350.

Primary, secondary, and tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery methods. Waterflooding, polymerflooding, gas injection, steam injection, in-situ combustion, chemical flooding, miscible flooding. Performance calculations and computer applications in EOR. 4 lectures.

ME 435. Drilling Engineering. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 329, ME 347.

Theory and practice of oilwell planning, drilling, well logging, and completion applied to the development of new oil and gas production, from onshore and offshore fields. 4 lectures.

ME 436. Petroleum Production Engineering. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 329, ME 347.

Design and operation of surface and subsurface equipment required in oil production. Processes and systems involved are rod pumping, gas lifting, acidizing, hydraulic fracturing, fluid gathering and storage, separation of oil, gas, water and sediment from produced fluid. Includes equipment used in enhanced oil recovery processes. 4 lectures.

ME 437. Nuclear Energy Power Generation. 4 units

Prerequisite: Junior standing; PHYS 132 and PHYS 133.

Operation of a nuclear electric generation station; includes reactor water chemistry, material science, electric science, mechanical science, civil engineering for the nuclear power plant engineers and digital process control systems. Field trip may be required. 4 lectures.

ME 438. Nuclear Power Plant Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 302.

Principal elements of pressurized water reactor nuclear power systems; overview of reactor physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer; includes basic reactor physics, reactor heat generation, reactor plant systems, support systems, and reactor safety. Field trip may be required. 4 lectures.

ME 439. Nuclear Power Plant Operations. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 437 or ME 438.

Overview of mass, momentum and energy conversion related to nuclear power plants; includes coupled neutronic/thermal models to study plant operation semi-quantitatively achieving an integrated plant understanding. Content includes: Neutron power kinetics, Coupled neutronic/thermal hydraulic modeling, Quantitative transient modeling, demonstration transients. Field trip may be required. 4 lectures.

ME 441. Single Track Vehicle Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 318, ME 329, or consent of instructor.

Design of single track vehicles, including handling characteristics, ergonomics and human power, strength and stiffness considerations, braking and suspension. Laboratory focus on designing a single track vehicle, including fabrication of a handling prototype. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 442. Design of Machinery. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 212.

Graphical synthesis and analysis of mechanisms and machines. Analytical fundamentals for study of displacements, velocities, accelerations, and static and dynamic forces necessary for design of planar linkages and gearing systems. Creative design projects using software simulation tools. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 443. Turbomachinery. 4 units

Prerequisite: MATH 344, ME 303, ME 347, and ME 350.

Performance characteristics of various types for liquids and for gases. Criteria for proper selection of type and main dimensions. Cavitation criteria. Gas turbine cycles and performance. Two-dimensional cascades. Axial flow turbines and compressors. Centrifugal compressors and radial-inflow turbines. 4 lectures.

ME 444. Combustion Engine Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 303, ME 347, and ME 350.

Application of design parameters to the various engine cycles. Aspects of the combustion processes. Emission regulation effects on engine design. Static and dynamic loading. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 450. Solar Thermal Power Systems. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 350. Recommended: ME 415.

High and intermediate temperature systems for conversion of solar energy to mechanical power and heat. Thermal energy storage and total thermal energy system design. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 453. Trends and Opportunities in HVAC&R. 1 unit

Prerequisite: ME 302 or ENVE 304.

Overview of the roles of the Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration (HVAC&R) industry. Presentation of state-of-the-art HVAC&R systems, components and design solutions. Includes guest speakers from HVAC&R industry. 1 activity.

ME 454. Benchmarking and Assessment of Building Energy Performance. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 350. Recommended: ME 359.

An introduction and study of building energy assessment principles and protocols for existing commercial buildings. Course topics include techniques of energy measurement and verification, energy metric comparison and analysis, and energy auditing. Field trip required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 455. Introduction to Building Energy Modeling. 3 units

Prerequisite: ME 350. Recommended: ME 359.

Introduction to principles and practices of building energy modeling. Case studies using state of the art energy modeling computer software to simulate the energy use of buildings. Methods to reduce energy consumption of buildings. 2 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 456. HVAC Air and Water Distribution System Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 302, ME 347.

Air and water distribution components and systems and the design of these systems with applications to the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 457. Refrigeration Principles and Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 341 and ME 350.

Basic engineering principles of refrigeration processes including: vapor compression cycles, multipressure systems, absorption systems, steam jet cooling, air cycles, and low temperature refrigeration. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 458. Building Heating and Cooling Loads. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 303 and ME 350.

Building heating and cooling load calculations, estimating energy consumption and operating costs for heating, ventilating and air-conditioning system design and selection. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 459. HVAC Senior Design Project I. 3 units

Prerequisite: ME 456.

First quarter of a two quarter sequence. Team project work in designing heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. New developments, policies and practices in the HVAC industry. Professional ethics relevant for practicing engineers. 1 lecture, 2 laboratories.

ME 460. HVAC Senior Design Project II. 2 units

Prerequisite: ME 459.

Continuation of work begun in ME 459. Team project designing heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. 2 laboratories.

ME 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

ME 471. Selected Advanced Laboratory. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 laboratories.

ME 488. Wind Energy Engineering. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 329, ME 347, ME 302.

Engineering aspects of windpower systems including mechanical design, support structure design, aerodynamic analysis, wind field analysis, system concepts and analysis, and economics. 4 lectures.

ME 493. Cooperative Education Experience. 2 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and consent of instructor.

Part-time work experience in business, industry, government, and other areas of student career interest. Positions are paid and usually require relocation and registration in course for two consecutive quarters. Formal report and evaluation by work supervisor required. Credit/No Credit grading only. No major credit allowed; total credit limited to 6 units.

ME 494. Cooperative Education Experience. 6 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and consent of instructor.

Full-time work experience in business, industry, government, and other areas of student career interest. Positions are paid and usually require relocation and registration in course for two consecutive quarters. Formal report and evaluation by work supervisor required. Credit/No Credit grading only. No major credit allowed; total credit limited to 18 units.

ME 495. Cooperative Education Experience. 12 units

CR/NC

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and consent of instructor.

Full-time work experience in business, industry, government, and other areas of student career interest. Positions are paid and usually require relocation and registration in course for two consecutive quarters. A more fully developed formal report and evaluation by work supervisor required. Credit/No Credit grading only. No major credit allowed; total credit limited to 24 units.

ME 500. Individual Study. 1-3 units

Prerequisite: Consent of department head, graduate advisor and supervising faculty member.

Advanced study planned and completed under the direction of a member of the department faculty. Open only to graduate students who have demonstrated ability to do independent work. Enrollment by petition.

ME 501. Continuum Mechanics and Elasticity. 4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Introduction to continuum mechanics. Kinematics, stress, and balance laws. Constitutive theory for isotropic and anisotropic solids and viscous fluids. Applications including design of beams and pressure vessels, stress concentrations, fiber-reinforced composites, and non-homogeneous biological materials. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CE 511/ME 501.

ME 503. Inelastic Stress Analysis. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 501 or CE 511.

Perfectly plastic and work hardening materials; von Mises and Tresca yield, isotropic and kinematic hardening flow rules, boundary-value problems. Finite elasticity: kinematics, Cauchy- and Green-elasticity, invariance, constraints, Neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin materials, experimental approaches, non-uniqueness, anisotropy, residual stress, thermoelasticity, boundary-value problems. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CE 513/ME 503.

ME 504. Finite Element Analysis. 4 units

Prerequisite: CE/ME 404 and CE 511/ME 501 or consent of instructor.

Finite element theory and application with a focus on computer implementation of the method. Strong, weak and variational formulations, physical and isoparametric spaces, error estimates, numerical integration, finite element algorithms, and programming architecture. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Crosslisted as CE/ME 504.

ME 506. System Dynamics. 4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Unified approach for mathematical modeling and analysis of dynamic physical systems which may store energy in multiple energy domains. Emphasis on developing lumped-parameter linear system models from a set of primitive elements in a systematic manner. 4 lectures.

ME 507. Mechanical Control System Design. 4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Application of principles of high-level design to mechanical control system implementation. Use of modified state transition logic in conjunction with object-oriented programming as design methodology. Real-time programming using above techniques for control of mechanical systems. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 517. Advanced Vibrations. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 318, graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Vibration of complex engineering systems. Inertia and stiffness matrices. Natural frequencies and normal modes. Approximate solutions and computer techniques. Response to transient and periodic inputs. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 518. Machinery Vibration and Rotor Dynamics. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 318, graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Vibrations relating to rotating machinery. Modeling of structural rotordynamic phenomena induced by shaft flexibility, bearings, and seals. Laboratory measurement of rotor system dynamic response and interpretation of machinery diagnostic information. Research project on a related topic. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 540. Viscous Flow. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 347, MATH 344 and graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Introduction to tensor calculus and indicial notation. Development of Reynolds' Transport Theory. Special forms of the governing equations of fluid motion. Internal flows and other classical solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. 4 lectures.

ME 541. Advanced Thermodynamics. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 303, ME 347, ME 350, and graduate standing.

Selected modern applications of thermodynamics which may include topics from: 1) equilibrium and kinetics as applied to combustion and air pollution, analysis and evaluation of techniques used to predict properties of gases and liquids, and 2) improvement of modern thermodynamic cycles by second law analysis. 4 lectures.

ME 542. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Compressible Flow. 4 units

Prerequisite: MATH 244, ME 303, ME 347, ME 350, and graduate standing.

Control volume analysis of fluid-thermo equations for one-dimensional, compressible flow involving area change, normal shocks, friction, and heat transfer. Two-dimensional supersonic flow including linearization, method of characteristics, and oblique shocks. One-dimensional constant area, unsteady flow, 4 lectures.

ME 552. Advanced Heat Transfer I. 4 units

Prerequisite: MATH 344, ME 347, ME 350, and graduate standing.

Advanced principles of heat transfer. Classical solution techniques to problems in conduction and/or radiation. 4 lectures.

ME 553. Advanced Heat Transfer II. 4 units

Prerequisite: MATH 344, ME 347, ME 350, and graduate standing.

Advanced principles of heat transfer. Classical solution techniques to problems in convection. 4 lectures.

ME 554. Computational Heat Transfer. 4 units

Prerequisite: MATH 418, ME 347, ME 350, and graduate standing.

Numerical solutions of classical, industrial, and experimental problems in conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 556. Advanced Heat Transfer III. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 347 or FPE 502; and ME 350.

Advanced principles of heat transfer. Classical solution techniques to problems in radiation with applications related to the role of radiation heat transfer in the development of fire in buildings. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as FPE/ME 556.

ME 563. Graduate Seminar. 1 unit

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in mechanical engineering program.

Current developments in mechanical engineering. Participation by graduate students, faculty and guests. 1 seminar.

ME 570. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units; may be repeated in same term. 1 to 4 seminars.

ME 571. Selected Advanced Laboratory. 1-4 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing of consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. The Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units; may be repeated in same term. 1 to 4 laboratories.

ME 579. Fluid Power Control. 4 units

Prerequisite: ME 418 or ME 419 or ME 422.

Design, analysis, and control of fluid power systems. Analysis of fluid power system components such as valves, actuators, pumps and motors. System response and stability. Dynamic modeling and computer simulation 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

ME 599. Design Project (Thesis). 1-9 units

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Each individual or group will be assigned a project for solution under faculty supervision as a requirement for the master's degree, culminating in a written report/thesis.

Charles B. Birdsong
B.S., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, 1991; M.S., Michigan State University, 1996; Ph.D., 1999.

John Chen
B.S., University of Virginia, 1984; M.S., Stanford University, 1987; Ph.D., 1991.

Andrew I. Davol
B.S., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, 1987; M.S., University of California, San Diego, 1993; Ph.D., 1998. Registered Professional Engineer, California.

Elthary Elghandour
B.S., Helwan University,Cairo, Egypt 1983; M.S. 1989; Ph.D., 1995.

Richard Emberley
B.S. Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 2011; M.S., 2013; Ph.D., University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, 2017.

Eric Espinoza-Wade
B.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2000; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2004; PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2007

Andrew J. Kean
B.E., The Cooper Union, 1997; M.S., University of California, Berkeley, 1999; Ph.D., 2003.

Stephen M. Klisch
B.S., University of Virginia, 1991; M.S., 1994; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1999.

Patrick Lemieux
B.Sc.Eng., University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada, 1991; M.Sc., Cranfield Institute of Technology, Bedford, England, 1992; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1999.

James Gaspare Locascio
B.S., Newark College of Engineering, 1970; M.S., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1971; Ph.D., 1988.

Benjamin Lutz
B.S., Virginia Tech, 2011; M.Eng., Virginia Tech, 2016; Ph.D., Virginia Tech, 2017

Thomas J. Mackin
B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1980; M.S., 1987; Ph.D., 1991.

Jesse Maddren
B.S., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1985; M.S., 1988; Ph.D., 1994. Registered Professional Engineer, California.

Sthanu Mahadev
B.S., Anna University, Chennai India, 2008, M.S., The University of Texas at Arlington, 2011, Ph.D., 2015.

Tom Mase
B.S.M.E., Michigan State University, 1980; M.S.M.E., University of California, Berkeley, 1982; Ph.D., 1987.

Hans Mayer
B.S., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, 2003; M.S., Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, 2005; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2016.

Mason Medizade
B.S., Abadan Institute of Technology, 1978; M.S., University of Southern California, 1980; Ph.D., 1984.

Joseph D. Mello
B.S., California Polytechnic State University, 1983; M.S., 1989; Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1996.

Jennifer Mott
B.S., California Polytechnic State University, 2005; M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2012.

William R. Murray
B.S., University of Texas, Austin, 1975; M.S., 1976; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1988.

Saeed B. Niku
B.S., Tehran Polytechnic University, 1975; M.S., Stanford University, 1976; Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1982. Registered Professional Engineer, California.

Mohammad Noori
B.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1977; M.S., Oklahoma State University, 1980; Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1984.

Franklin C. Owen
BSME, Mississippi State University, 1978; MSME, Oregon State University, 1983; Ph.D., University of Texas, 1998. Registered Professional Engineer, Maine.

Christopher C. Pascual
B.S., Cornell University, 1985; M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology, 1996; Ph.D., 1999. Registered Professional Engineer, California.

Steffen Peuker
Dipl.-Ing. (FH), Mannheim University of Applied Sciences, Mannheim, Germany; M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2006; Ph.D., 2010.

Hemanth Porumamila
B.E., BMS College of Engineering, Bangalore, India, 2000; M.S., Iowa State University, 2003; Ph.D., 2007.

John R. Ridgely
B.S., University of California, Berkeley, 1986; M.S., 1988; Ph.D., 2001.

Peter J. Schuster
B.A., Cornell University, 1991; M.S., Stanford University, 1992; Ph.D., Michigan Technological University, 2000.

Brian P. Self
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1988; M.S., 1991; Ph.D., University of Utah, 1996.

Kim A. Shollenberger
B.S., Cornell University, 1989; M.S., University of California, Berkeley, 1991; Ph.D., 1994.

Glen E. Thorncroft
BSE, University of Central Florida, 1988; MSME, 1991; Ph.D., University of Florida, 1997.

Russell Westphal
B.S., Washington State University, 1978; M.S., Stanford University, 1979; Ph.D., 1983.

James M. Widmann
B.S., Michigan Technological University, 1987; M.S., Stanford University, 1988; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1995.

Xi Wu
M.S., Chong Qing University, 1991; Dr. Eng., Cleveland State University, 2005.

Siyuan Xing
B.S., Sichuan University, 2013; M.S., Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, 2016; Ph.D., Southern Illionis University Carbondale, 2019.